A qualitative study of the importance and etiology of chronic respiratory disease in Alaska native children.

Kenneth M. Petersen, Rosalyn J. Singleton, Lori Leonard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To generate new hypotheses about factors that may contribute to chronic respiratory disease in Alaska Native children in rural Alaska. METHODS: Qualitative formative research with interviews of community members, village healthcare providers, and referral providers in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Region of Alaska. RESULTS: The respondents identified chronic and acute respiratory illnesses as the most important serious child health problems of the region. They believed that chronic respiratory conditions, especially asthma, were increasing. The most frequently discussed potential contributing factors were smoke, dust, feeding practices, socioeconomic conditions, and mold. The intervention mentioned most frequently that would make the greatest impact was a more timely diagnosis of asthma. CONCLUSIONS: Reports of an increase in chronic respiratory problems are parallel with reports of increases in dust and mold in the communities. Further environmental quantitative research is necessary to confirm the importance of these factors. In addition, improved education for identification and treatment of asthma would appear to be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalAlaska medicine
Volume45
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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