A priming dose of oral vitamin A given to preschool children may extend protection conferred by a subsequent large dose of vitamin A

J. H. Humphrey, K. P. West, Muhilal, Chu See Lai Chu See, G. Natadisastra, A. Sommer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A randomized trial tested whether a priming dose of vitamin A would extend the protection of a subsequent 60,000-μg retinol equivalent (RE) oral dose. Seventy-five xerophthalmic and 74 age- and neighborhood-matched non- xerophthalmic preschool children were randomized to one of three oral regimens of vitamin A, receiving peanut oil only (Group A), 7500 μg RE (Group B) or 60,000 μg RE (Group C), followed in all instances by 60,000 μg RE 1 wk later. Serum retinol was measured 2, 4, 6 and 12 mo following the second dose by technicians unaware of the children's treatment status. Among xerophthalmic children, mean values differed across treatment groups at 2 mo (C > A) and tended to be different at 12 mo (C > A and B > A). Among non- xerophthalmic children mean retinol concentrations differed across treatment groups at 6 mo, but not in a consistent way (A > C > B), and at 12 mo (C > A and B > A). Xerophthalmic children reverted to biochemical deficiency faster than non-xerophthalmic children. A small or large priming dose may extend the protection conferred by a 60,000-μg RE dose, supporting the use of repeated, spaced doses of vitamin A for treating xerophthalmia. Similar retinol concentrations in Groups B and C at 12 mo suggest the 60,000-μg RE prophylactic dose currently recommended by the World Health Organization need not be increased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1363-1369
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume123
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1993

Keywords

  • Indonesia
  • periodic vitamin A dosing
  • preschool children
  • vitamin A deficiency
  • xerophthalmia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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