A preliminary investigation: Effect of a corporate fitness program on absenteeism and health care cost

William B. Baun, Edward J. Bemacki, Shan P. Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A random sample of 517 employees was studied to determine differences in health care costs and absenteeism among exercisers and nonexercisers during the start-up of a corporate health and fitness program. Exercise was associated with decreased illness absence among female exercisers (47 v 69 hours, P<.05) and there was a trend for illness absence to be inversely related to advancing age among exercisers, whereas illness absence increased among nonexercisers. Total health care costs among exercisers was lower (male $561, females $639) than among nonexercisers (male $1,003, females $1,535). Due to the large variation in the individual cost, the differences between exercisers and nonexercisers were not statistically significant. Ambulatory health care cost for nonexercisers (males $486, females $883) were significantly higher than the costs for exercisers (males $408, females $843). Because the differences were found upon program initiation, they were thought to be characteristics of exercisers and not due to exercise itself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-22
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Occupational Medicine
Volume28
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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