A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies on the association between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and risk of prostate cancer

Joshua Petimar, Kathryn M. Wilson, Kana Wu, Molin Wang, Demetrius Albanes, Piet A. Van Den Brandt, Michael B. Cook, Graham G. Giles, Edward L. Giovannucci, Gary E. Goodman, Phyllis J. Goodman, Niclas Håkansson, Kathy Helzlsouer, Timothy J. Key, Laurence N. Kolonel, Linda M. Liao, Satu Männistö, Marjorie L. McCullough, Roger L. Milne, Marian L. NeuhouserYikyung Park, Elizabeth A Platz, Elio Riboli, Norie Sawada, Jeannette M. Schenk, Shoichiro Tsugane, Bas Verhage, Ying Wang, Lynne R. Wilkens, Alicja Wolk, Regina G. Ziegler, Stephanie A. Smith-Warner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Relationships between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk are unclear. Methods: We examined associations between fruit and vegetable groups, specific fruits and vegetables, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk overall, by stage and grade, and for prostate cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohorts, including 52, 680 total cases and 3, 205 prostate cancer-related deaths among 842, 149 men. Diet was measured by a food frequency questionnaire or similar instrument at baseline. We calculated study-specific relative risks using Cox proportional hazards regression, and then pooled these estimates using a random effects model. Results: We did not observe any statistically significant associations for advanced prostate cancer or prostate cancer mortality with any food group (including total fruits and vegetables, total fruits, total vegetables, fruit and vegetable juice, cruciferous vegetables, and tomato products), nor specific fruit and vegetables. In addition, we observed few statistically significant results for other prostate cancer outcomes. Pooled multivariable relative risks comparing the highest versus lowest quantiles across all fruit and vegetable exposures and prostate cancer outcomes ranged from 0.89 to 1.09. There was no evidence of effect modification for any association by age or body mass index. Conclusions: Results from this large, international, pooled analysis do not support a strong role of collective groupings of fruits, vegetables, or mature beans in prostate cancer. Impact: Further investigation of other dietary exposures, especially indicators of bioavailable nutrient intake or specific phytochemicals, should be considered for prostate cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1276-87.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1276-1287
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Vegetables
Fruit
Prostatic Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Food
Mortality
Phytochemicals
Lycopersicon esculentum
Tumor Biomarkers
Body Mass Index
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies on the association between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and risk of prostate cancer. / Petimar, Joshua; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Wu, Kana; Wang, Molin; Albanes, Demetrius; Van Den Brandt, Piet A.; Cook, Michael B.; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goodman, Gary E.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Håkansson, Niclas; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Key, Timothy J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Liao, Linda M.; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Park, Yikyung; Platz, Elizabeth A; Riboli, Elio; Sawada, Norie; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Verhage, Bas; Wang, Ying; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wolk, Alicja; Ziegler, Regina G.; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 26, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 1276-1287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Petimar, J, Wilson, KM, Wu, K, Wang, M, Albanes, D, Van Den Brandt, PA, Cook, MB, Giles, GG, Giovannucci, EL, Goodman, GE, Goodman, PJ, Håkansson, N, Helzlsouer, K, Key, TJ, Kolonel, LN, Liao, LM, Männistö, S, McCullough, ML, Milne, RL, Neuhouser, ML, Park, Y, Platz, EA, Riboli, E, Sawada, N, Schenk, JM, Tsugane, S, Verhage, B, Wang, Y, Wilkens, LR, Wolk, A, Ziegler, RG & Smith-Warner, SA 2017, 'A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies on the association between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and risk of prostate cancer', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 26, no. 8, pp. 1276-1287. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-1006
Petimar, Joshua ; Wilson, Kathryn M. ; Wu, Kana ; Wang, Molin ; Albanes, Demetrius ; Van Den Brandt, Piet A. ; Cook, Michael B. ; Giles, Graham G. ; Giovannucci, Edward L. ; Goodman, Gary E. ; Goodman, Phyllis J. ; Håkansson, Niclas ; Helzlsouer, Kathy ; Key, Timothy J. ; Kolonel, Laurence N. ; Liao, Linda M. ; Männistö, Satu ; McCullough, Marjorie L. ; Milne, Roger L. ; Neuhouser, Marian L. ; Park, Yikyung ; Platz, Elizabeth A ; Riboli, Elio ; Sawada, Norie ; Schenk, Jeannette M. ; Tsugane, Shoichiro ; Verhage, Bas ; Wang, Ying ; Wilkens, Lynne R. ; Wolk, Alicja ; Ziegler, Regina G. ; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. / A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies on the association between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and risk of prostate cancer. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 8. pp. 1276-1287.
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abstract = "Background: Relationships between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk are unclear. Methods: We examined associations between fruit and vegetable groups, specific fruits and vegetables, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk overall, by stage and grade, and for prostate cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohorts, including 52, 680 total cases and 3, 205 prostate cancer-related deaths among 842, 149 men. Diet was measured by a food frequency questionnaire or similar instrument at baseline. We calculated study-specific relative risks using Cox proportional hazards regression, and then pooled these estimates using a random effects model. Results: We did not observe any statistically significant associations for advanced prostate cancer or prostate cancer mortality with any food group (including total fruits and vegetables, total fruits, total vegetables, fruit and vegetable juice, cruciferous vegetables, and tomato products), nor specific fruit and vegetables. In addition, we observed few statistically significant results for other prostate cancer outcomes. Pooled multivariable relative risks comparing the highest versus lowest quantiles across all fruit and vegetable exposures and prostate cancer outcomes ranged from 0.89 to 1.09. There was no evidence of effect modification for any association by age or body mass index. Conclusions: Results from this large, international, pooled analysis do not support a strong role of collective groupings of fruits, vegetables, or mature beans in prostate cancer. Impact: Further investigation of other dietary exposures, especially indicators of bioavailable nutrient intake or specific phytochemicals, should be considered for prostate cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1276-87.",
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T1 - A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies on the association between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and risk of prostate cancer

AU - Petimar, Joshua

AU - Wilson, Kathryn M.

AU - Wu, Kana

AU - Wang, Molin

AU - Albanes, Demetrius

AU - Van Den Brandt, Piet A.

AU - Cook, Michael B.

AU - Giles, Graham G.

AU - Giovannucci, Edward L.

AU - Goodman, Gary E.

AU - Goodman, Phyllis J.

AU - Håkansson, Niclas

AU - Helzlsouer, Kathy

AU - Key, Timothy J.

AU - Kolonel, Laurence N.

AU - Liao, Linda M.

AU - Männistö, Satu

AU - McCullough, Marjorie L.

AU - Milne, Roger L.

AU - Neuhouser, Marian L.

AU - Park, Yikyung

AU - Platz, Elizabeth A

AU - Riboli, Elio

AU - Sawada, Norie

AU - Schenk, Jeannette M.

AU - Tsugane, Shoichiro

AU - Verhage, Bas

AU - Wang, Ying

AU - Wilkens, Lynne R.

AU - Wolk, Alicja

AU - Ziegler, Regina G.

AU - Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Background: Relationships between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk are unclear. Methods: We examined associations between fruit and vegetable groups, specific fruits and vegetables, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk overall, by stage and grade, and for prostate cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohorts, including 52, 680 total cases and 3, 205 prostate cancer-related deaths among 842, 149 men. Diet was measured by a food frequency questionnaire or similar instrument at baseline. We calculated study-specific relative risks using Cox proportional hazards regression, and then pooled these estimates using a random effects model. Results: We did not observe any statistically significant associations for advanced prostate cancer or prostate cancer mortality with any food group (including total fruits and vegetables, total fruits, total vegetables, fruit and vegetable juice, cruciferous vegetables, and tomato products), nor specific fruit and vegetables. In addition, we observed few statistically significant results for other prostate cancer outcomes. Pooled multivariable relative risks comparing the highest versus lowest quantiles across all fruit and vegetable exposures and prostate cancer outcomes ranged from 0.89 to 1.09. There was no evidence of effect modification for any association by age or body mass index. Conclusions: Results from this large, international, pooled analysis do not support a strong role of collective groupings of fruits, vegetables, or mature beans in prostate cancer. Impact: Further investigation of other dietary exposures, especially indicators of bioavailable nutrient intake or specific phytochemicals, should be considered for prostate cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1276-87.

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