A polarized salivary cell monolayer useful for studying transepithelial fluid movement in vitro

Xinjun He, Gemma A.J. Kuijpers, Gertrud Goping, Jill A. Kulakusky, Changyu Zheng, Christine Delporte, Chung Ming Tse, Robert S. Redman, Mark Donowitz, Harvey B. Pollard, Bruce J. Baum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There are no reported, convenient in vitro models for studying polarized functions in salivary epithelial sells. Accordingly, we examined three often-used salivary cell lines for their ability to form a polarized monolayer on permeable, collagen-coated polycarbonate filters. Only the SMIE line, derived from rat submandibular gland, had this ability. The SMIE cell monolayer exhibited junctional complexes, with a tight-junction-associated protein, ZO-1, localized to cell-cell contact areas. The Na+/K+-ATPase α1-subunit was detected predominantly in the basolateral membranes, while the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 2 appeared primarily in the apical membranes. Using adenovirus-mediated cDNA transfer, SMIE cells were shown to be capable of routing marker proteins (β-galactosidase ± a nuclear targeting signal, α1-antitrypsin, aquaporin-1) to appropriate locations. Furthermore, this salivary cell monolayer provided a convenient tool for studying aquaporin-1-mediated, osmotically directed, transepithelial fluid movement in vitro. Thus, SMIE cells appear to be a useful experimental model with which to study some polarized functions in a salivary epithelial cell line.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-381
Number of pages7
JournalPflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
Volume435
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 1998

Keywords

  • Aquaporin-1
  • Epithelial cell
  • Facilitated fluid movement
  • Polarity
  • Protein targeting
  • Salivary gland

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Physiology (medical)

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  • Cite this

    He, X., Kuijpers, G. A. J., Goping, G., Kulakusky, J. A., Zheng, C., Delporte, C., Tse, C. M., Redman, R. S., Donowitz, M., Pollard, H. B., & Baum, B. J. (1998). A polarized salivary cell monolayer useful for studying transepithelial fluid movement in vitro. Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology, 435(3), 375-381. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004240050526