A placebo-controlled trial of a HEPA air cleaner in the treatment of cat allergy

Robert A Wood, E. F. Johnson, Mark L Van Natta, Hua Chen Pei Hua Chen, P. A. Eggleston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To evaluate the effect of a room high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaner on cat-induced asthma and rhinitis, 35 cat-allergic subjects who were living with one or more cats were studied in a doubleblind, placebo controlled trial. After a 1 mo baseline period, subjects' bedrooms were equipped with an active or placebo air cleaner for the following 3 mo. Evaluations included monthly measurement of cat-allergen levels, daily morning, afternoon, and nighttime nasal- and chest-symptom scores, twice- daily measurement of peak-flow rates, daily medication scores, monthly spirometry, and methacholine (MCh) challenge testing before and after the study. Airborne allergen levels were reduced in the active-filter group as compared with the placebo group (p = 0.045). However, no differences were detected in settled-dust allergen levels (p = 0.485), morning, afternoon, or nighttime nasalsymptom scores (p = 0.769, 0.534, and 0.138), chest-symptom scores (p = 0.388, 0.179, and 0.215), sleep disturbance (p = 0.101), morning or afternoon peak-flow rates (p = 0.424 and 0.679), or rescue medication use (nasal, p = 0.164, chest, p = 0.650), respectively. Although the combination of a HEPA room air cleaner, mattress and pillow covers, and cat exclusion from the bedroom did reduce airborne cat-allergen levels, no effect on disease activity was detected for any parameter studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-120
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume158
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Hypersensitivity
Cats
Air
Placebos
Allergens
Thorax
Nose
Therapeutics
Methacholine Chloride
Spirometry
Rhinitis
Dust
Sleep
Asthma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

A placebo-controlled trial of a HEPA air cleaner in the treatment of cat allergy. / Wood, Robert A; Johnson, E. F.; Van Natta, Mark L; Pei Hua Chen, Hua Chen; Eggleston, P. A.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 158, No. 1, 1998, p. 115-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2706ce79e729478793e40b08b9ff44e4,
title = "A placebo-controlled trial of a HEPA air cleaner in the treatment of cat allergy",
abstract = "To evaluate the effect of a room high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaner on cat-induced asthma and rhinitis, 35 cat-allergic subjects who were living with one or more cats were studied in a doubleblind, placebo controlled trial. After a 1 mo baseline period, subjects' bedrooms were equipped with an active or placebo air cleaner for the following 3 mo. Evaluations included monthly measurement of cat-allergen levels, daily morning, afternoon, and nighttime nasal- and chest-symptom scores, twice- daily measurement of peak-flow rates, daily medication scores, monthly spirometry, and methacholine (MCh) challenge testing before and after the study. Airborne allergen levels were reduced in the active-filter group as compared with the placebo group (p = 0.045). However, no differences were detected in settled-dust allergen levels (p = 0.485), morning, afternoon, or nighttime nasalsymptom scores (p = 0.769, 0.534, and 0.138), chest-symptom scores (p = 0.388, 0.179, and 0.215), sleep disturbance (p = 0.101), morning or afternoon peak-flow rates (p = 0.424 and 0.679), or rescue medication use (nasal, p = 0.164, chest, p = 0.650), respectively. Although the combination of a HEPA room air cleaner, mattress and pillow covers, and cat exclusion from the bedroom did reduce airborne cat-allergen levels, no effect on disease activity was detected for any parameter studied.",
author = "Wood, {Robert A} and Johnson, {E. F.} and {Van Natta}, {Mark L} and {Pei Hua Chen}, {Hua Chen} and Eggleston, {P. A.}",
year = "1998",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "158",
pages = "115--120",
journal = "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "1073-449X",
publisher = "American Thoracic Society",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A placebo-controlled trial of a HEPA air cleaner in the treatment of cat allergy

AU - Wood, Robert A

AU - Johnson, E. F.

AU - Van Natta, Mark L

AU - Pei Hua Chen, Hua Chen

AU - Eggleston, P. A.

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - To evaluate the effect of a room high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaner on cat-induced asthma and rhinitis, 35 cat-allergic subjects who were living with one or more cats were studied in a doubleblind, placebo controlled trial. After a 1 mo baseline period, subjects' bedrooms were equipped with an active or placebo air cleaner for the following 3 mo. Evaluations included monthly measurement of cat-allergen levels, daily morning, afternoon, and nighttime nasal- and chest-symptom scores, twice- daily measurement of peak-flow rates, daily medication scores, monthly spirometry, and methacholine (MCh) challenge testing before and after the study. Airborne allergen levels were reduced in the active-filter group as compared with the placebo group (p = 0.045). However, no differences were detected in settled-dust allergen levels (p = 0.485), morning, afternoon, or nighttime nasalsymptom scores (p = 0.769, 0.534, and 0.138), chest-symptom scores (p = 0.388, 0.179, and 0.215), sleep disturbance (p = 0.101), morning or afternoon peak-flow rates (p = 0.424 and 0.679), or rescue medication use (nasal, p = 0.164, chest, p = 0.650), respectively. Although the combination of a HEPA room air cleaner, mattress and pillow covers, and cat exclusion from the bedroom did reduce airborne cat-allergen levels, no effect on disease activity was detected for any parameter studied.

AB - To evaluate the effect of a room high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaner on cat-induced asthma and rhinitis, 35 cat-allergic subjects who were living with one or more cats were studied in a doubleblind, placebo controlled trial. After a 1 mo baseline period, subjects' bedrooms were equipped with an active or placebo air cleaner for the following 3 mo. Evaluations included monthly measurement of cat-allergen levels, daily morning, afternoon, and nighttime nasal- and chest-symptom scores, twice- daily measurement of peak-flow rates, daily medication scores, monthly spirometry, and methacholine (MCh) challenge testing before and after the study. Airborne allergen levels were reduced in the active-filter group as compared with the placebo group (p = 0.045). However, no differences were detected in settled-dust allergen levels (p = 0.485), morning, afternoon, or nighttime nasalsymptom scores (p = 0.769, 0.534, and 0.138), chest-symptom scores (p = 0.388, 0.179, and 0.215), sleep disturbance (p = 0.101), morning or afternoon peak-flow rates (p = 0.424 and 0.679), or rescue medication use (nasal, p = 0.164, chest, p = 0.650), respectively. Although the combination of a HEPA room air cleaner, mattress and pillow covers, and cat exclusion from the bedroom did reduce airborne cat-allergen levels, no effect on disease activity was detected for any parameter studied.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031870012&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031870012&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9655716

AN - SCOPUS:0031870012

VL - 158

SP - 115

EP - 120

JO - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

JF - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

SN - 1073-449X

IS - 1

ER -