A novel HIV treatment model using private practitioners in South Africa

Craig Innes, Robin Hamilton, Christopher Hoffmann, Piotr Hippner, Katherine Fielding, Alison D. Grant, Gavin J. Churchyard, Salome Charalambous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The extent of the HIV epidemic in South Africa may render the public sector capacity inadequate to manage all patients requiring antiretroviral treatment (ART). Private practitioners are an underutilised resource. Methods: The authors developed a model of care using 72 private practitioners in five provinces in urban and rural areas of South Africa with centralised clinical support, training, pharmacy control and data management. The authors describe the programme, its quality control measures and patient outcomes using a cohort analysis. Results: Between January 2005 and December 2008, 9102 individuals were started on ART, 62% female, median age 34 years, median viral load 50 655 copies/ml and median baseline CD4 count 123 cells/μl. Retention (alive and in care) after 12 months was 63% in the 2005 cohort (646 of 1026) and remained similar in the other calendar years, 58%, 68% and 64% in 2006, 2007 and 2008, respectively. After 36 months, retention was 50% and 41% for those enrolled in 2005 and 2006, respectively. The percentage virally suppressed remained similar at 6 months, 82% vs 84%, 84% and 85% from 2005, 2006, 2007 to 2008, respectively, p=0.66; but improved slightly at 12 months, 78% vs 83%, 83% and 84% from 2005 to 2008, p=0.05. At 36 months, it was 84% and 82% for the 2005 and 2006 cohorts, respectively. Conclusions: The results show that a well-managed private practitioner model can achieve comparable results to public services, although long-term retention needs further evaluation. This model of ART delivery can be used to expand access to ART in areas where the public sector is unable to meet the demand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-140
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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South Africa
HIV
Public Sector
Training Support
Therapeutics
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
Quality Control
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Innes, C., Hamilton, R., Hoffmann, C., Hippner, P., Fielding, K., Grant, A. D., ... Charalambous, S. (2012). A novel HIV treatment model using private practitioners in South Africa. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 88(2), 136-140. https://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2011-050194

A novel HIV treatment model using private practitioners in South Africa. / Innes, Craig; Hamilton, Robin; Hoffmann, Christopher; Hippner, Piotr; Fielding, Katherine; Grant, Alison D.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Charalambous, Salome.

In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, Vol. 88, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 136-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Innes, C, Hamilton, R, Hoffmann, C, Hippner, P, Fielding, K, Grant, AD, Churchyard, GJ & Charalambous, S 2012, 'A novel HIV treatment model using private practitioners in South Africa', Sexually Transmitted Infections, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 136-140. https://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2011-050194
Innes, Craig ; Hamilton, Robin ; Hoffmann, Christopher ; Hippner, Piotr ; Fielding, Katherine ; Grant, Alison D. ; Churchyard, Gavin J. ; Charalambous, Salome. / A novel HIV treatment model using private practitioners in South Africa. In: Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2012 ; Vol. 88, No. 2. pp. 136-140.
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