A nonhuman primate model of age-related bone loss: A longitudinal study in male and premenopausal female rhesus monkeys

A. Black, E. M. Tilmont, A. M. Handy, W. W. Scott, S. A. Shapses, D. K. Ingram, G. S. Roth, M. A. Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aging is associated with gradual bone loss in men and premenopausal women, with an accelerated rate of loss after menopause in women. Although many studies have investigated bone loss due to surgically induced estrogen depletion, little is known regarding normal age-related changes in bone mass in animal models. We used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to measure bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and projected area (PA) at four skeletal sites over 4 years in 20 premenopausal female (8-23 years) and 29 male (8-27 years) rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Forearm BMD declined with age in both male and female monkeys. Lean mass was positively associated with BMD at all sites in males and with the distal radius in females. Serum osteocalcin declined and urinary cross-links increased with age in males but not females. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations decreased with age in females, and a similar trend was observed in males. In conclusion, an age-related decline in forearm BMD was observed in male and female rhesus monkeys. Total body BMC declined over time in older females, with a similar trend in males. Changes in markers of bone turnover with age were also observed in male monkeys. The results of this longitudinal study suggest that the rhesus monkey is a potential model for age-related changes in the human skeleton.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-302
Number of pages8
JournalBone
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2001

Keywords

  • Age
  • Bone loss
  • Bone turnover
  • Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)
  • Nonhuman primates
  • Rhesus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Histology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A nonhuman primate model of age-related bone loss: A longitudinal study in male and premenopausal female rhesus monkeys'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this