A national survey on physician trainee participation in pediatric interfacility transport

Elizabeth A. Herrup, Bruce L. Klein, Jennifer Schuette, Philomena M. Costabile, Corina Noje

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To ascertain the national experience regarding which physician trainees are allowed to participate in pediatric interfacility transports and what is considered adequate education and training for physician trainees prior to participating in the transport of children. Design: Self-administered electronic survey. Setting: Pediatric transport teams listed with the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Transport Medicine. Subjects: Leaders of U.S. pediatric transport teams. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Forty-four of the 90 U.S. teams surveyed (49%) responded. Thirty-nine (89%) were university hospital-affiliated. Most programs (26/43, 60%) allowed trainees to participate in pediatric transport in some capacity. Mandatory transport rotations were reported for pediatric critical care (PICU) fellows (9/42, 21%), neonatology (neonatal ICU) fellows (6/42, 14%), pediatric emergency medicine fellows (4/41, 10%), emergency medicine residents (3/43, 7%), and pediatric residents (2/43, 5%). Fellow participation was reported by 19 of 28 programs (68%) with PICU fellowships, 12 of 25 programs (48%) with pediatric emergency medicine fellowships, and 10 of 34 programs (29%) with neonatal ICU fellowships. Transport programs with greater than or equal to 1,000 annual incoming transports were more likely to include PICU and pediatric emergency medicine fellows as providers (p = 0.04; 95% CI, 1.04-25.71 and p = 0.02; 95% CI, 1.31-53.75). Most commonly, trainees functioned as medical control physicians (86%), provided minute-to-minute medical direction for critically ill patients (62%), performed intubations (52%), and were code leaders for patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation during transport (52%). Most transport programs required pediatric residents, PICU, and pediatric emergency medicine fellows to complete a PICU rotation prior to participating in pediatric transports. The majority of transport programs did not use any metrics to determine airway proficiency of physician trainees. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity with regard to the types of physician trainees allowed to participate in pediatric interfacility transports, the roles played by physician trainees during pediatric transport, and the training (or lack thereof) provided to physician trainees prior to their participating in pediatric transports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-227
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • Interhospital transport
  • Medical education
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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