A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership

Nina E. Glass, Afif N. Kulaylat, Feibi Zheng, Carly E. Glarner, Konstantinos P. Economopoulos, Osama H. Hamed, James G. Bittner, Joseph Sakran, Robert D. Winfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Contemporary surgical education includes online resources, mobile platform applications, and simulation training. The aim of this study was to characterize educational tools used by surgical residents.

Methods An anonymous web-based survey was distributed to 9,913 members of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons.

Results We received 773 completed surveys. To prepare for examinations and expand fund of knowledge, most respondents used printed textbooks, online textbooks, and Surgical Council on Resident Education modules, respectively. Respondents used online textbooks and journal articles most often to investigate timely patient care issues. In contrast, mobile platform applications and online videos/lectures were used least. Fewer than half of respondents used simulators, limited by clinical duties, absence of feedback/supervision, and lack of working supplies.

Conclusions Traditional educational resources dominate trainee preferences, although utilization of the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum continues to grow. Simulators remain a required tool for laparoscopic training, and incorporation of structured feedback and improved supervision may improve utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-64
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume209
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Textbooks
Mobile Applications
Education
Financial Management
Curriculum
Patient Care
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Graduate medical education
  • SCORE
  • Simulation
  • Surgical education
  • Surgical residency training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Glass, N. E., Kulaylat, A. N., Zheng, F., E. Glarner, C., Economopoulos, K. P., Hamed, O. H., ... Winfield, R. D. (2015). A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership. American Journal of Surgery, 209(1), 59-64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.09.016

A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership. / Glass, Nina E.; Kulaylat, Afif N.; Zheng, Feibi; E. Glarner, Carly; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P.; Hamed, Osama H.; Bittner, James G.; Sakran, Joseph; Winfield, Robert D.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 209, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 59-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glass, NE, Kulaylat, AN, Zheng, F, E. Glarner, C, Economopoulos, KP, Hamed, OH, Bittner, JG, Sakran, J & Winfield, RD 2015, 'A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 209, no. 1, pp. 59-64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.09.016
Glass, Nina E. ; Kulaylat, Afif N. ; Zheng, Feibi ; E. Glarner, Carly ; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P. ; Hamed, Osama H. ; Bittner, James G. ; Sakran, Joseph ; Winfield, Robert D. / A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2015 ; Vol. 209, No. 1. pp. 59-64.
@article{f32e1d77c6e040f0a245f4d95cb8fd3e,
title = "A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership",
abstract = "Background Contemporary surgical education includes online resources, mobile platform applications, and simulation training. The aim of this study was to characterize educational tools used by surgical residents.Methods An anonymous web-based survey was distributed to 9,913 members of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons.Results We received 773 completed surveys. To prepare for examinations and expand fund of knowledge, most respondents used printed textbooks, online textbooks, and Surgical Council on Resident Education modules, respectively. Respondents used online textbooks and journal articles most often to investigate timely patient care issues. In contrast, mobile platform applications and online videos/lectures were used least. Fewer than half of respondents used simulators, limited by clinical duties, absence of feedback/supervision, and lack of working supplies.Conclusions Traditional educational resources dominate trainee preferences, although utilization of the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum continues to grow. Simulators remain a required tool for laparoscopic training, and incorporation of structured feedback and improved supervision may improve utilization.",
keywords = "Barriers, Graduate medical education, SCORE, Simulation, Surgical education, Surgical residency training",
author = "Glass, {Nina E.} and Kulaylat, {Afif N.} and Feibi Zheng and {E. Glarner}, Carly and Economopoulos, {Konstantinos P.} and Hamed, {Osama H.} and Bittner, {James G.} and Joseph Sakran and Winfield, {Robert D.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.09.016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "209",
pages = "59--64",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership

AU - Glass, Nina E.

AU - Kulaylat, Afif N.

AU - Zheng, Feibi

AU - E. Glarner, Carly

AU - Economopoulos, Konstantinos P.

AU - Hamed, Osama H.

AU - Bittner, James G.

AU - Sakran, Joseph

AU - Winfield, Robert D.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background Contemporary surgical education includes online resources, mobile platform applications, and simulation training. The aim of this study was to characterize educational tools used by surgical residents.Methods An anonymous web-based survey was distributed to 9,913 members of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons.Results We received 773 completed surveys. To prepare for examinations and expand fund of knowledge, most respondents used printed textbooks, online textbooks, and Surgical Council on Resident Education modules, respectively. Respondents used online textbooks and journal articles most often to investigate timely patient care issues. In contrast, mobile platform applications and online videos/lectures were used least. Fewer than half of respondents used simulators, limited by clinical duties, absence of feedback/supervision, and lack of working supplies.Conclusions Traditional educational resources dominate trainee preferences, although utilization of the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum continues to grow. Simulators remain a required tool for laparoscopic training, and incorporation of structured feedback and improved supervision may improve utilization.

AB - Background Contemporary surgical education includes online resources, mobile platform applications, and simulation training. The aim of this study was to characterize educational tools used by surgical residents.Methods An anonymous web-based survey was distributed to 9,913 members of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons.Results We received 773 completed surveys. To prepare for examinations and expand fund of knowledge, most respondents used printed textbooks, online textbooks, and Surgical Council on Resident Education modules, respectively. Respondents used online textbooks and journal articles most often to investigate timely patient care issues. In contrast, mobile platform applications and online videos/lectures were used least. Fewer than half of respondents used simulators, limited by clinical duties, absence of feedback/supervision, and lack of working supplies.Conclusions Traditional educational resources dominate trainee preferences, although utilization of the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum continues to grow. Simulators remain a required tool for laparoscopic training, and incorporation of structured feedback and improved supervision may improve utilization.

KW - Barriers

KW - Graduate medical education

KW - SCORE

KW - Simulation

KW - Surgical education

KW - Surgical residency training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84915747260&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84915747260&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.09.016

DO - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.09.016

M3 - Article

VL - 209

SP - 59

EP - 64

JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

IS - 1

ER -