A National Study Examining Emergency Medicine Specialty Training and Quality Measures in the Emergency Department

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to measure the relationship between emergency medicine (EM) specialty training and quality measures in the emergency department (ED). Data were gathered from the 2003-2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. The outcome was proportion of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pneumonia (PNA), and long-bone fracture (LBF) who received recommended therapy. These measures were analyzed with respect to EM residency completion. Compared with EDs with more than 80% EM-trained physicians, EDs with fewer than 80% EM-trained physicians had similar rates of aspirin (43% vs 42%) and ß-blocker (26% vs 19%) use for AMI, appropriate antibiotics (78% vs 83%) and pulse oximetry (51% vs 55%) for PNA, and analgesia (85% vs 79%) for LBF. Additionally, a composite end point and an adjusted model showed no statistical difference across these measures. The proportion of residency-trained EM physicians did not affect the use of recommended treatment for AMI, PNA, and LBF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-435
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • emergency department
  • emergency medicine
  • emergency medicine training
  • long-bone fracture
  • myocardial infarction
  • patient safety
  • pneumonia
  • quality of health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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