A myelin-related transcriptomic profile is shared by Pitt–Hopkins syndrome models and human autism spectrum disorder

Ba Doi N. Phan, Joseph F. Bohlen, Brittany A. Davis, Zengyou Ye, Huei Ying Chen, Brent Mayfield, Srinidhi Rao Sripathy, Stephanie Cerceo Page, Morganne N. Campbell, Hannah L. Smith, Danisha Gallop, Hyojin Kim, Courtney L. Thaxton, Jeremy M. Simon, Emily E. Burke, Joo Heon Shin, Andrew J. Kennedy, J. David Sweatt, Benjamin D. Philpot, Andrew E. JaffeBrady J. Maher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is genetically heterogeneous with convergent symptomatology, suggesting common dysregulated pathways. In this study, we analyzed brain transcriptional changes in five mouse models of Pitt–Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), a syndromic form of ASD caused by mutations in the TCF4 gene, but not the TCF7L2 gene. Analyses of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) highlighted oligodendrocyte (OL) dysregulation, which we confirmed in two additional mouse models of syndromic ASD (Ptenm3m4/m3m4 and Mecp2tm1.1Bird). The PTHS mouse models showed cell-autonomous reductions in OL numbers and myelination, functionally confirming OL transcriptional signatures. We also integrated PTHS mouse model DEGs with human idiopathic ASD postmortem brain RNA-sequencing data and found significant enrichment of overlapping DEGs and common myelination-associated pathways. Notably, DEGs from syndromic ASD mouse models and reduced deconvoluted OL numbers distinguished human idiopathic ASD cases from controls across three postmortem brain data sets. These results implicate disruptions in OL biology as a cellular mechanism in ASD pathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-385
Number of pages11
JournalNature neuroscience
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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