A modified Atkins diet is effective for the treatment of intractable pediatric epilepsy

Eric H Kossoff, Jane R. McGrogan, Renee M. Bluml, Diana J. Pillas, James Rubenstein, Eileen P.G. Vining

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The Atkins diet may induce ketosis as does the ketogenic diet, without restrictions on calories, fluids, protein, or need for an inpatient fast and admission. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a modified Atkins diet for intractable childhood epilepsy. Methods: Twenty children were treated prospectively in a hospital-based ambulatory clinic from September 2003 to May 2005. Children aged 3-18 years, with at least three seizures per week, who had been treated with at least two anticonvulsants, were enrolled and received the diet over a 6-month period. Carbohydrates were initially limited to 10 g/day, and fats were encouraged. Parents measured urinary ketones semiweekly and recorded seizures daily. All children received vitamin and calcium supplementation. Results: In all children, at least moderate urinary ketosis developed within 4 days (mean, 1.9). Sixteen (80%) completed the 6-month study; 14 chose to remain on the diet afterward. At 6 months, 13 (65%) had >50% improvement, and seven (35%) had >90% improvement (four were seizure free). Mean seizure frequency after 6 months was 40 per week (p = 0.005). Over a 6-month period, mean serum blood urea nitrogen increased from 12 to 17 mg/dl (p = 0.01); creatinine was unchanged. Cholesterol increased from 192 to 221 mg/dl, (p = 0.06). Weight did not change significantly (34.0-33.7 kg); only six children lost weight. A stable body mass index over time correlated with >90% improvement (p = 0.004). Conclusions: A modified Atkins diet is an effective and well-tolerated therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-424
Number of pages4
JournalEpilepsia
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

Fingerprint

Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
Pediatrics
Seizures
Ketosis
Ketogenic Diet
Diet
Therapeutics
Weights and Measures
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Ketones
Vitamins
Anticonvulsants
Inpatients
Creatinine
Body Mass Index
Parents
Fats
Cholesterol
Carbohydrates
Drug Resistant Epilepsy

Keywords

  • Atkins diet
  • Children
  • Epilepsy
  • Ketogenic diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

A modified Atkins diet is effective for the treatment of intractable pediatric epilepsy. / Kossoff, Eric H; McGrogan, Jane R.; Bluml, Renee M.; Pillas, Diana J.; Rubenstein, James; Vining, Eileen P.G.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 47, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 421-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kossoff, Eric H ; McGrogan, Jane R. ; Bluml, Renee M. ; Pillas, Diana J. ; Rubenstein, James ; Vining, Eileen P.G. / A modified Atkins diet is effective for the treatment of intractable pediatric epilepsy. In: Epilepsia. 2006 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 421-424.
@article{dd072ebb1dfd4bb18dbbcba631657424,
title = "A modified Atkins diet is effective for the treatment of intractable pediatric epilepsy",
abstract = "Purpose: The Atkins diet may induce ketosis as does the ketogenic diet, without restrictions on calories, fluids, protein, or need for an inpatient fast and admission. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a modified Atkins diet for intractable childhood epilepsy. Methods: Twenty children were treated prospectively in a hospital-based ambulatory clinic from September 2003 to May 2005. Children aged 3-18 years, with at least three seizures per week, who had been treated with at least two anticonvulsants, were enrolled and received the diet over a 6-month period. Carbohydrates were initially limited to 10 g/day, and fats were encouraged. Parents measured urinary ketones semiweekly and recorded seizures daily. All children received vitamin and calcium supplementation. Results: In all children, at least moderate urinary ketosis developed within 4 days (mean, 1.9). Sixteen (80{\%}) completed the 6-month study; 14 chose to remain on the diet afterward. At 6 months, 13 (65{\%}) had >50{\%} improvement, and seven (35{\%}) had >90{\%} improvement (four were seizure free). Mean seizure frequency after 6 months was 40 per week (p = 0.005). Over a 6-month period, mean serum blood urea nitrogen increased from 12 to 17 mg/dl (p = 0.01); creatinine was unchanged. Cholesterol increased from 192 to 221 mg/dl, (p = 0.06). Weight did not change significantly (34.0-33.7 kg); only six children lost weight. A stable body mass index over time correlated with >90{\%} improvement (p = 0.004). Conclusions: A modified Atkins diet is an effective and well-tolerated therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy.",
keywords = "Atkins diet, Children, Epilepsy, Ketogenic diet",
author = "Kossoff, {Eric H} and McGrogan, {Jane R.} and Bluml, {Renee M.} and Pillas, {Diana J.} and James Rubenstein and Vining, {Eileen P.G.}",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/j.1528-1167.2006.00438.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "421--424",
journal = "Epilepsia",
issn = "0013-9580",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A modified Atkins diet is effective for the treatment of intractable pediatric epilepsy

AU - Kossoff, Eric H

AU - McGrogan, Jane R.

AU - Bluml, Renee M.

AU - Pillas, Diana J.

AU - Rubenstein, James

AU - Vining, Eileen P.G.

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - Purpose: The Atkins diet may induce ketosis as does the ketogenic diet, without restrictions on calories, fluids, protein, or need for an inpatient fast and admission. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a modified Atkins diet for intractable childhood epilepsy. Methods: Twenty children were treated prospectively in a hospital-based ambulatory clinic from September 2003 to May 2005. Children aged 3-18 years, with at least three seizures per week, who had been treated with at least two anticonvulsants, were enrolled and received the diet over a 6-month period. Carbohydrates were initially limited to 10 g/day, and fats were encouraged. Parents measured urinary ketones semiweekly and recorded seizures daily. All children received vitamin and calcium supplementation. Results: In all children, at least moderate urinary ketosis developed within 4 days (mean, 1.9). Sixteen (80%) completed the 6-month study; 14 chose to remain on the diet afterward. At 6 months, 13 (65%) had >50% improvement, and seven (35%) had >90% improvement (four were seizure free). Mean seizure frequency after 6 months was 40 per week (p = 0.005). Over a 6-month period, mean serum blood urea nitrogen increased from 12 to 17 mg/dl (p = 0.01); creatinine was unchanged. Cholesterol increased from 192 to 221 mg/dl, (p = 0.06). Weight did not change significantly (34.0-33.7 kg); only six children lost weight. A stable body mass index over time correlated with >90% improvement (p = 0.004). Conclusions: A modified Atkins diet is an effective and well-tolerated therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy.

AB - Purpose: The Atkins diet may induce ketosis as does the ketogenic diet, without restrictions on calories, fluids, protein, or need for an inpatient fast and admission. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a modified Atkins diet for intractable childhood epilepsy. Methods: Twenty children were treated prospectively in a hospital-based ambulatory clinic from September 2003 to May 2005. Children aged 3-18 years, with at least three seizures per week, who had been treated with at least two anticonvulsants, were enrolled and received the diet over a 6-month period. Carbohydrates were initially limited to 10 g/day, and fats were encouraged. Parents measured urinary ketones semiweekly and recorded seizures daily. All children received vitamin and calcium supplementation. Results: In all children, at least moderate urinary ketosis developed within 4 days (mean, 1.9). Sixteen (80%) completed the 6-month study; 14 chose to remain on the diet afterward. At 6 months, 13 (65%) had >50% improvement, and seven (35%) had >90% improvement (four were seizure free). Mean seizure frequency after 6 months was 40 per week (p = 0.005). Over a 6-month period, mean serum blood urea nitrogen increased from 12 to 17 mg/dl (p = 0.01); creatinine was unchanged. Cholesterol increased from 192 to 221 mg/dl, (p = 0.06). Weight did not change significantly (34.0-33.7 kg); only six children lost weight. A stable body mass index over time correlated with >90% improvement (p = 0.004). Conclusions: A modified Atkins diet is an effective and well-tolerated therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy.

KW - Atkins diet

KW - Children

KW - Epilepsy

KW - Ketogenic diet

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645326867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645326867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2006.00438.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2006.00438.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 16499770

AN - SCOPUS:33645326867

VL - 47

SP - 421

EP - 424

JO - Epilepsia

JF - Epilepsia

SN - 0013-9580

IS - 2

ER -