A model for membrane patchiness: Lateral diffusion in the presence of barriers and vesicle traffic

Levi A. Gheber, Michael A Edidin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patches (lateral heterogeneities) of cell surface membrane proteins and lipids have been imaged by a number of different microscopy techniques. This patchiness has been taken as evidence for the organization of membranes into domains whose composition differs from the average for the entire membrane. However, the mechanism and specificity of patch formation are not understood. Here we show how vesicle traffic to and from a cell surface membrane can create patches of molecules of the size observed experimentally. Our computer model takes into account lateral diffusion, barriers to lateral diffusion, and vesicle traffic to and from the plasma membrane. Neither barriers nor vesicle traffic alone create and maintain patches. Only the combination of these produces a dynamic but persistent patchiness of membrane proteins and lipids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3163-3175
Number of pages13
JournalBiophysical Journal
Volume77
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1999

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Membrane Proteins
Membrane Lipids
Membranes
Cell Membrane
Computer Simulation
Microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

A model for membrane patchiness : Lateral diffusion in the presence of barriers and vesicle traffic. / Gheber, Levi A.; Edidin, Michael A.

In: Biophysical Journal, Vol. 77, No. 6, 12.1999, p. 3163-3175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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