A mixed-methods exploration of faith, spirituality, and health program interest among older African Americans with HIV

Allysha C. Maragh-Bass, Danetta Hendricks Sloan, Fahid Alghanim, Amy R. Knowlton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Persons living with HIV (PLWH) are living into old age with more complex care needs that non-PLWH. Promoting quality of life should include advance care planning (ACP) education, particularly among African Americans. We explored faith/spirituality-related correlates of interest in a future quality of life program among African American PLWH. Methods: Data were from the AFFIRM study. Participants were recruited from an HIV clinic and completed surveys, interviews, and focus groups. Quantitative analyses included Logistic regression. Qualitative data were coded using grounded theory. Results: Nearly half of participants had less than a high school education (47.9%), and roughly 90% had heard of at least one ACP-related topic (86.6%; N = 315). Qualitative themes related to quality of life and faith/spirituality were: (1) Coping with life challenges; (2) Motivation to improve health for loved ones; and (3) Support programs for people with HIV (N = 39). Satisfaction with religion/spirituality was associated with greater interest in a future program (p <.05); discussing ACP before getting sick was associated with less interest (p <.05). Conclusions/practice implications: Prioritizing skill-building and grounding in spirituality with input from faith leaders can reduce ACP inequities and improve health outcomes among African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalQuality of Life Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Advanced care planning
  • African Americans
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Health disparities
  • Healthcare mandates
  • Quality of life
  • Urban health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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