A mindfulness intervention to reduce maternal distress in neonatal intensive care: a mixed methods pilot study

Tamar Mendelson, Ciara McAfee, April Joy Damian, Amitoj Brar, Pamela Kimzey Donohue, Erica Sibinga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mothers with an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at risk for depression, anxiety, and trauma symptoms, with negative implications for maternal-infant bonding, maternal well-being, and infant development. Few interventions to promote NICU mothers’ mental health, however, have been developed or tested. This pre-post pilot study assessed feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of a mindfulness intervention for NICU mothers. Twenty-seven mothers were recruited from a university NICU and offered a mindfulness intervention via introductory video and audio-recorded practices. Participants completed a baseline self-report survey. After 2 weeks of engaging with intervention materials, participants completed a second survey and in-depth interview. Quantitative data were analyzed using paired t tests; qualitative data were analyzed using thematic coding. Twenty-four women (89%) completed the study. Quantitative data indicated significant improvements in depressive, anxiety, and trauma symptoms, negative coping, NICU-related stress, and sleep (p < 0.05). Qualitative data identified themes of perceived improvements in psychological distress and stress symptoms, self-care, and relationships. Findings support the mindfulness intervention’s feasibility, acceptability, and potential promise for reducing maternal distress and promoting well-being. Use of video and audio modalities may facilitate program sustainability and scale up. Further research on the program is merited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Women's Mental Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 5 2018

Fingerprint

Neonatal Intensive Care
Mindfulness
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Mothers
Anxiety
Wounds and Injuries
Program Evaluation
Self Care
Child Development
Psychological Stress
Self Report
Mental Health
Sleep
Interviews
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • Maternal distress
  • Maternal well-being
  • Mindfulness
  • Neonatal intensive care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "A mindfulness intervention to reduce maternal distress in neonatal intensive care: a mixed methods pilot study",
abstract = "Mothers with an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at risk for depression, anxiety, and trauma symptoms, with negative implications for maternal-infant bonding, maternal well-being, and infant development. Few interventions to promote NICU mothers’ mental health, however, have been developed or tested. This pre-post pilot study assessed feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of a mindfulness intervention for NICU mothers. Twenty-seven mothers were recruited from a university NICU and offered a mindfulness intervention via introductory video and audio-recorded practices. Participants completed a baseline self-report survey. After 2 weeks of engaging with intervention materials, participants completed a second survey and in-depth interview. Quantitative data were analyzed using paired t tests; qualitative data were analyzed using thematic coding. Twenty-four women (89{\%}) completed the study. Quantitative data indicated significant improvements in depressive, anxiety, and trauma symptoms, negative coping, NICU-related stress, and sleep (p < 0.05). Qualitative data identified themes of perceived improvements in psychological distress and stress symptoms, self-care, and relationships. Findings support the mindfulness intervention’s feasibility, acceptability, and potential promise for reducing maternal distress and promoting well-being. Use of video and audio modalities may facilitate program sustainability and scale up. Further research on the program is merited.",
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AU - McAfee, Ciara

AU - Damian, April Joy

AU - Brar, Amitoj

AU - Donohue, Pamela Kimzey

AU - Sibinga, Erica

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