A microbe-dependent viral key to Crohn's box

Daniel A. Peterson, Peter J. Turnbaugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Once Pandora unlocked her fateful box and liberated the evil forces within, it became impossible to put them back. Now, new work on Crohn's disease suggests the existence of a viral "key" that irreversibly renders a genetically susceptible mouse prone to pathogenesis. Indeed, dangerous liaisons among host genotype, viral infection, intestinal injury, and trillions of gut microbes may in part determine which individuals progress to a full-blown disease state. These findings suggest that viral and bacterial triggers may serve as therapeutic targets for Crohn's and prompt new hypotheses that relate inflammation, host immune status, microbial community structure, and human health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number43ps39
JournalScience Translational Medicine
Volume2
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 4 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
Crohn Disease
Genotype
Inflammation
Health
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A microbe-dependent viral key to Crohn's box. / Peterson, Daniel A.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

In: Science Translational Medicine, Vol. 2, No. 43, 43ps39, 04.08.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peterson, Daniel A. ; Turnbaugh, Peter J. / A microbe-dependent viral key to Crohn's box. In: Science Translational Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 2, No. 43.
@article{5f1c8f036c6a4b0196ad8810456222dd,
title = "A microbe-dependent viral key to Crohn's box",
abstract = "Once Pandora unlocked her fateful box and liberated the evil forces within, it became impossible to put them back. Now, new work on Crohn's disease suggests the existence of a viral {"}key{"} that irreversibly renders a genetically susceptible mouse prone to pathogenesis. Indeed, dangerous liaisons among host genotype, viral infection, intestinal injury, and trillions of gut microbes may in part determine which individuals progress to a full-blown disease state. These findings suggest that viral and bacterial triggers may serve as therapeutic targets for Crohn's and prompt new hypotheses that relate inflammation, host immune status, microbial community structure, and human health.",
author = "Peterson, {Daniel A.} and Turnbaugh, {Peter J.}",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1126/scitranslmed.3001422",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
journal = "Science Translational Medicine",
issn = "1946-6234",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "43",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A microbe-dependent viral key to Crohn's box

AU - Peterson, Daniel A.

AU - Turnbaugh, Peter J.

PY - 2010/8/4

Y1 - 2010/8/4

N2 - Once Pandora unlocked her fateful box and liberated the evil forces within, it became impossible to put them back. Now, new work on Crohn's disease suggests the existence of a viral "key" that irreversibly renders a genetically susceptible mouse prone to pathogenesis. Indeed, dangerous liaisons among host genotype, viral infection, intestinal injury, and trillions of gut microbes may in part determine which individuals progress to a full-blown disease state. These findings suggest that viral and bacterial triggers may serve as therapeutic targets for Crohn's and prompt new hypotheses that relate inflammation, host immune status, microbial community structure, and human health.

AB - Once Pandora unlocked her fateful box and liberated the evil forces within, it became impossible to put them back. Now, new work on Crohn's disease suggests the existence of a viral "key" that irreversibly renders a genetically susceptible mouse prone to pathogenesis. Indeed, dangerous liaisons among host genotype, viral infection, intestinal injury, and trillions of gut microbes may in part determine which individuals progress to a full-blown disease state. These findings suggest that viral and bacterial triggers may serve as therapeutic targets for Crohn's and prompt new hypotheses that relate inflammation, host immune status, microbial community structure, and human health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955610809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955610809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/scitranslmed.3001422

DO - 10.1126/scitranslmed.3001422

M3 - Article

C2 - 20686177

AN - SCOPUS:77955610809

VL - 2

JO - Science Translational Medicine

JF - Science Translational Medicine

SN - 1946-6234

IS - 43

M1 - 43ps39

ER -