A meta-analysis of neuropsychological, social cognitive, and olfactory functioning in the behavioral and language variants of frontotemporal dementia

Vidyulata Kamath, Grace Anna S. Chaney, Jonathan Deright, Chiadikaobi U Onyike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BackgroundThough meta-analyses of neuropsychological and social cognitive deficits in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) have been conducted, no study has comprehensively characterized and compared the neuropsychological, social cognitive, and olfactory profiles in the behavioral and language variants of FTD.MethodsOur search yielded 470 publications meeting inclusion criteria representing 11 782 FTD patients and 19 451 controls. For each domain, we calculated Hedges' g effect sizes, which represent the mean difference between the patient and control group divided by the pooled standard deviation. The heterogeneity of these effects was assessed with Cochran's Q-statistic using a random-effects model. Meta-regressions were employed to analyze the influence of demographic and disease characteristics.ResultsThough semantic variant primary progressive aphasia patients showed the greatest impairment across all task types, the three groups showed similar cognitive effect sizes once contributions from the language subdomain were excluded from analysis. Contrary to expectation, the magnitude of deficits in executive functioning, social cognition and olfaction were comparable between the three subgroups. Among indices, a metric of executive errors distinguished the behavioral variant of FTD from the language phenotypes.ConclusionsThese data indicate that social cognitive and traditional executive functioning measures may not capture differences between FTD syndromes. These results have important implications for the interpretation of neuropsychological assessments, particularly when applied to the differential diagnosis of FTD. It is hoped that these findings will guide clinical and research assessments and spur new studies focused on improving the measurement of FTD syndromes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Frontotemporal Dementia
Meta-Analysis
Language
Primary Progressive Aphasia
Smell
Semantics
Cognition
Publications
Differential Diagnosis
Demography
Phenotype
Control Groups
Research

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • emotion
  • frontotemporal lobar degeneration
  • primary progressive aphasia
  • progressive non-fluent aphasia
  • semantic dementia
  • semantic variant primary progressive aphasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{3206f00238d547258f750072f85f0e0b,
title = "A meta-analysis of neuropsychological, social cognitive, and olfactory functioning in the behavioral and language variants of frontotemporal dementia",
abstract = "BackgroundThough meta-analyses of neuropsychological and social cognitive deficits in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) have been conducted, no study has comprehensively characterized and compared the neuropsychological, social cognitive, and olfactory profiles in the behavioral and language variants of FTD.MethodsOur search yielded 470 publications meeting inclusion criteria representing 11 782 FTD patients and 19 451 controls. For each domain, we calculated Hedges' g effect sizes, which represent the mean difference between the patient and control group divided by the pooled standard deviation. The heterogeneity of these effects was assessed with Cochran's Q-statistic using a random-effects model. Meta-regressions were employed to analyze the influence of demographic and disease characteristics.ResultsThough semantic variant primary progressive aphasia patients showed the greatest impairment across all task types, the three groups showed similar cognitive effect sizes once contributions from the language subdomain were excluded from analysis. Contrary to expectation, the magnitude of deficits in executive functioning, social cognition and olfaction were comparable between the three subgroups. Among indices, a metric of executive errors distinguished the behavioral variant of FTD from the language phenotypes.ConclusionsThese data indicate that social cognitive and traditional executive functioning measures may not capture differences between FTD syndromes. These results have important implications for the interpretation of neuropsychological assessments, particularly when applied to the differential diagnosis of FTD. It is hoped that these findings will guide clinical and research assessments and spur new studies focused on improving the measurement of FTD syndromes.",
keywords = "Cognition, emotion, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, primary progressive aphasia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, semantic dementia, semantic variant primary progressive aphasia",
author = "Vidyulata Kamath and Chaney, {Grace Anna S.} and Jonathan Deright and Onyike, {Chiadikaobi U}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291718003604",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A meta-analysis of neuropsychological, social cognitive, and olfactory functioning in the behavioral and language variants of frontotemporal dementia

AU - Kamath, Vidyulata

AU - Chaney, Grace Anna S.

AU - Deright, Jonathan

AU - Onyike, Chiadikaobi U

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - BackgroundThough meta-analyses of neuropsychological and social cognitive deficits in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) have been conducted, no study has comprehensively characterized and compared the neuropsychological, social cognitive, and olfactory profiles in the behavioral and language variants of FTD.MethodsOur search yielded 470 publications meeting inclusion criteria representing 11 782 FTD patients and 19 451 controls. For each domain, we calculated Hedges' g effect sizes, which represent the mean difference between the patient and control group divided by the pooled standard deviation. The heterogeneity of these effects was assessed with Cochran's Q-statistic using a random-effects model. Meta-regressions were employed to analyze the influence of demographic and disease characteristics.ResultsThough semantic variant primary progressive aphasia patients showed the greatest impairment across all task types, the three groups showed similar cognitive effect sizes once contributions from the language subdomain were excluded from analysis. Contrary to expectation, the magnitude of deficits in executive functioning, social cognition and olfaction were comparable between the three subgroups. Among indices, a metric of executive errors distinguished the behavioral variant of FTD from the language phenotypes.ConclusionsThese data indicate that social cognitive and traditional executive functioning measures may not capture differences between FTD syndromes. These results have important implications for the interpretation of neuropsychological assessments, particularly when applied to the differential diagnosis of FTD. It is hoped that these findings will guide clinical and research assessments and spur new studies focused on improving the measurement of FTD syndromes.

AB - BackgroundThough meta-analyses of neuropsychological and social cognitive deficits in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) have been conducted, no study has comprehensively characterized and compared the neuropsychological, social cognitive, and olfactory profiles in the behavioral and language variants of FTD.MethodsOur search yielded 470 publications meeting inclusion criteria representing 11 782 FTD patients and 19 451 controls. For each domain, we calculated Hedges' g effect sizes, which represent the mean difference between the patient and control group divided by the pooled standard deviation. The heterogeneity of these effects was assessed with Cochran's Q-statistic using a random-effects model. Meta-regressions were employed to analyze the influence of demographic and disease characteristics.ResultsThough semantic variant primary progressive aphasia patients showed the greatest impairment across all task types, the three groups showed similar cognitive effect sizes once contributions from the language subdomain were excluded from analysis. Contrary to expectation, the magnitude of deficits in executive functioning, social cognition and olfaction were comparable between the three subgroups. Among indices, a metric of executive errors distinguished the behavioral variant of FTD from the language phenotypes.ConclusionsThese data indicate that social cognitive and traditional executive functioning measures may not capture differences between FTD syndromes. These results have important implications for the interpretation of neuropsychological assessments, particularly when applied to the differential diagnosis of FTD. It is hoped that these findings will guide clinical and research assessments and spur new studies focused on improving the measurement of FTD syndromes.

KW - Cognition

KW - emotion

KW - frontotemporal lobar degeneration

KW - primary progressive aphasia

KW - progressive non-fluent aphasia

KW - semantic dementia

KW - semantic variant primary progressive aphasia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058075249&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058075249&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291718003604

DO - 10.1017/S0033291718003604

M3 - Article

C2 - 30520407

AN - SCOPUS:85058075249

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

ER -