A meta-analysis comparing the biochemistry of primary hyperparathyroidism in youths to the biochemistry of primary hyperparathyroidism in adults

Jeffrey Roizen, Michael A. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: The distinctive presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in adults and youths suggest that PHPT is a fundamentally different disease in these two groups. Objective: To understand the difference in PHPT between adults and youths we compared the biochemistry of PHPT in these two groups. Design: This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis of retrospective studies published 1966-2014 on PHPT. Data Sources: All studies were obtained through Medline (1966-2014). Study Selection and Data Extraction: Only studies that included post-surgical subjects and that explicitly described biochemical results from more than one decade were included. Data were extracted from each article to generate the mean and SE for multiple biochemical parameters. Data Synthesis: We analyzed 16 studies describing 268 unique youths and 2405 adults with PHPT. Youths with PHPT had significantly (P <.05) greater serum and urinary calcium than adults with PHPT (3.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L vs 2.8 ± 0.0 mmol/L for serum calcium, and 9.95 ± 1.26 mmol/d vs 7.15 ± 0.56 mmol/d for urine calcium,[mean ± SEM]). There were no significant differences in serum intact PTH, phosphorus, or alkaline phosphatase. Conclusions: Juvenile PHPT has greater hyper calcemia and hypercalciuria than adult PHPT at similar concentrations of serum intact PTH. These observations suggest that there are differences in the pathophysiology of PHPT between juvenile and adult patients who reflect an apparent decrease in the sensitivity of the parathyroid adenoma to negative feedback by calcium and increased sensitivity of target tissues to the effects of PTH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4555-4564
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume99
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Biochemistry
Primary Hyperparathyroidism
Meta-Analysis
Calcium
Phosphorus
Alkaline Phosphatase
Serum
Tissue
Feedback
Scanning electron microscopy
Hypercalciuria
Parathyroid Neoplasms
Information Storage and Retrieval
Hypercalcemia
Retrospective Studies
Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

A meta-analysis comparing the biochemistry of primary hyperparathyroidism in youths to the biochemistry of primary hyperparathyroidism in adults. / Roizen, Jeffrey; Levine, Michael A.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 99, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 4555-4564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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