A longitudinal study of the effects of coping motives, negative affect and drinking level on drinking problems among college students

Stephen Armeli, Erik Dranoff, Howard Tennen, Carol Shaw Austad, Carolyn R. Fallahi, Sarah Raskin, Rebecca Wood, Godfrey Pearlson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    We examined among college students the interactive effects of drinking to cope (DTC) motivation, anxiety and depression symptoms, and drinking level in predicting drinking-related problems (DRPs). Using an Internet-based survey, participants (N = 844, 53% women) first reported on their drinking motives and monthly for up to three months, they reported on their drinking level, anxiety, depression, and DRPs. We found a three-way interaction between DTC motivation and average levels of drinking and anxiety (but not depression) in predicting DRPs. Specifically, among individuals with stronger DTC motives, higher mean levels of anxiety were associated with a stronger positive association between mean drinking levels and DRPs. We did not find three-way interactions in the models examining monthly changes in anxiety, depression, and drinking in predicting monthly DRPs. However, individuals high in DTC motivation showed a stronger positive association between changes in drinking level and DRPs. The results are discussed in terms of mechanisms related to attention-allocation and self-control resource depletion.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)527-541
    Number of pages15
    JournalAnxiety, Stress and Coping
    Volume27
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 2014

    Keywords

    • anxiety
    • depression
    • drinking motives
    • drinking-related problems

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Clinical Psychology
    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A longitudinal study of the effects of coping motives, negative affect and drinking level on drinking problems among college students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this