A longitudinal evaluation of family caregivers' willingness to pay for an in-home nonpharmacologic intervention for people living with dementia: Results from a randomized trial

Eric Jutkowitz, Laura T. Pizzi, Jonah Popp, Katherine K. Prioli, Danny Scerpella, Katherine Marx, Quincy Miles Samus, Catherine Verrier Piersol, Laura N. Gitlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To determine the willingness-to-pay (WTP) of family caregivers to learn care strategies for persons living with dementia (PLwD). Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting: Community-dwelling PLwD and their caregivers (dyads) in Maryland and Washington, DC. Participants: 250 dyads. Intervention: Tailored Activity Program (TAP) compared to attention control. TAP provides activities tailored to the PLwD and instructs caregivers in their use. Measurement: At baseline, 3 and 6 months, caregivers were asked their WTP per session for an 8-session 3-month in-home nonpharmacologic intervention to address behavioral symptoms and functional dependence. Results: At baseline, 3 and 6 months, caregivers assigned to TAP were willing to pay $26.10/session (95%CI:$20.42, $33.00), $28.70 (95%CI:$19.73, $39.30), and $22.79 (95%CI: $16.64, $30.09), respectively; attention control caregivers were willing to pay $37.90/session (95%CI: $27.10, $52.02), $30.92 (95%CI: $23.44, $40.94), $27.44 (95%CI: $20.82, $35.34), respectively. The difference in baseline to 3 and 6 months change in WTP between TAP and the attention control was $9.58 (95%CI:-$5.00, $25.47) and $7.15 (95%CI:-$5.72, $21.81). The difference between TAP and attention control in change in the proportion of caregivers willing to pay something from baseline to 3 and 6 months was-12% (95%CI:-28%,-5%) and-7% (95%CI:-25%,-11%), respectively. The difference in change in WTP, among caregivers willing to pay something, between TAP and attention control from baseline to 3 and 6 months was $17.93 (95%CI: $0.22, $38.30) and $11.81 (95%CI:-$2.57, $28.17). Conclusions: Family caregivers are willing to pay more for an intervention immediately following participation in a program similar to which they were asked to value.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-428
Number of pages10
JournalInternational psychogeriatrics
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • caregiving
  • dementia
  • long-term care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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