A joint network optimization framework to predict clinical severity from resting state functional MRI data

N. S. D'Souza, M. B. Nebel, N. Wymbs, S. H. Mostofsky, A. Venkataraman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We propose a novel optimization framework to predict clinical severity from resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. Our model consists of two coupled terms. The first term decomposes the correlation matrices into a sparse set of representative subnetworks that define a network manifold. These subnetworks are modeled as rank-one outer-products which correspond to the elemental patterns of co-activation across the brain; the subnetworks are combined via patient-specific non-negative coefficients. The second term is a linear regression model that uses the patient-specific coefficients to predict a measure of clinical severity. We validate our framework on two separate datasets in a ten fold cross validation setting. The first is a cohort of fifty-eight patients diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The second dataset consists of sixty three patients from a publicly available ASD database. Our method outperforms standard semi-supervised frameworks, which employ conventional graph theoretic and statistical representation learning techniques to relate the rs-fMRI correlations to behavior. In contrast, our joint network optimization framework exploits the structure of the rs-fMRI correlation matrices to simultaneously capture group level effects and patient heterogeneity. Finally, we demonstrate that our proposed framework robustly identifies clinically relevant networks characteristic of ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116314
JournalNeuroImage
Volume206
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • Clinical severity
  • Dictionary learning
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Matrix factorization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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