A hypomorphic PIGA gene mutation causes severe defects in neuron development and susceptibility to complement-mediated toxicity in a human iPSC model

Xuan Yuan, Zhe Li, Andrea C. Baines, Eleni Gavriilaki, Zhaohui Ye, Zhexing Wen, Evan M. Braunstein, Leslie G. Biesecker, Linzhao Cheng, Xinzhong Dong, Robert A. Brodsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mutations in genes involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis underlie a group of congenital syndromes characterized by severe neurodevelopmental defects. GPI anchored proteins have diverse roles in cell adhesion, signaling, metabolism and complement regulation. Over 30 enzymes are required for GPI anchor biosynthesis and PIGA is involved in the first step of this process. A hypomorphic mutation in the X-linked PIGA gene (c.1234C>T) causes multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizure syndrome 2 (MCAHS2), indicating that even partial reduction of GPI anchored proteins dramatically impairs central nervous system development, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we established a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) model containing the PIGAc.1234C>T mutation to study the effects of a hypomorphic allele of PIGA on neuronal development. Neuronal differentiation from neural progenitor cells generated by EB formation in PIGAc.1234C>T is significantly impaired with decreased proliferation, aberrant synapse formation and abnormal membrane depolarization. The results provide direct evidence for a critical role of GPI anchor proteins in early neurodevelopment. Furthermore, neural progenitors derived from PIGAc.1234C>T hiPSCs demonstrate increased susceptibility to complement-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting that defective complement regulation may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0174074
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

complement
mutation
Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
Neurons
Mutation
Genes
genes
proteins
Proteins
Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein
neurodevelopment
biosynthesis
Anthralin
Biosynthesis
Defects
synapse
seizures
cell adhesion
stem cells
cytotoxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

A hypomorphic PIGA gene mutation causes severe defects in neuron development and susceptibility to complement-mediated toxicity in a human iPSC model. / Yuan, Xuan; Li, Zhe; Baines, Andrea C.; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Ye, Zhaohui; Wen, Zhexing; Braunstein, Evan M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Cheng, Linzhao; Dong, Xinzhong; Brodsky, Robert A.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 12, No. 4, e0174074, 01.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yuan, Xuan; Li, Zhe; Baines, Andrea C.; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Ye, Zhaohui; Wen, Zhexing; Braunstein, Evan M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Cheng, Linzhao; Dong, Xinzhong; Brodsky, Robert A. / A hypomorphic PIGA gene mutation causes severe defects in neuron development and susceptibility to complement-mediated toxicity in a human iPSC model.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 12, No. 4, e0174074, 01.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a622224737d148d7b8322dc7dbbe0204,
title = "A hypomorphic PIGA gene mutation causes severe defects in neuron development and susceptibility to complement-mediated toxicity in a human iPSC model",
abstract = "Mutations in genes involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis underlie a group of congenital syndromes characterized by severe neurodevelopmental defects. GPI anchored proteins have diverse roles in cell adhesion, signaling, metabolism and complement regulation. Over 30 enzymes are required for GPI anchor biosynthesis and PIGA is involved in the first step of this process. A hypomorphic mutation in the X-linked PIGA gene (c.1234C>T) causes multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizure syndrome 2 (MCAHS2), indicating that even partial reduction of GPI anchored proteins dramatically impairs central nervous system development, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we established a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) model containing the PIGAc.1234C>T mutation to study the effects of a hypomorphic allele of PIGA on neuronal development. Neuronal differentiation from neural progenitor cells generated by EB formation in PIGAc.1234C>T is significantly impaired with decreased proliferation, aberrant synapse formation and abnormal membrane depolarization. The results provide direct evidence for a critical role of GPI anchor proteins in early neurodevelopment. Furthermore, neural progenitors derived from PIGAc.1234C>T hiPSCs demonstrate increased susceptibility to complement-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting that defective complement regulation may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.",
author = "Xuan Yuan and Zhe Li and Baines, {Andrea C.} and Eleni Gavriilaki and Zhaohui Ye and Zhexing Wen and Braunstein, {Evan M.} and Biesecker, {Leslie G.} and Linzhao Cheng and Xinzhong Dong and Brodsky, {Robert A.}",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0174074",
volume = "12",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A hypomorphic PIGA gene mutation causes severe defects in neuron development and susceptibility to complement-mediated toxicity in a human iPSC model

AU - Yuan,Xuan

AU - Li,Zhe

AU - Baines,Andrea C.

AU - Gavriilaki,Eleni

AU - Ye,Zhaohui

AU - Wen,Zhexing

AU - Braunstein,Evan M.

AU - Biesecker,Leslie G.

AU - Cheng,Linzhao

AU - Dong,Xinzhong

AU - Brodsky,Robert A.

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Mutations in genes involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis underlie a group of congenital syndromes characterized by severe neurodevelopmental defects. GPI anchored proteins have diverse roles in cell adhesion, signaling, metabolism and complement regulation. Over 30 enzymes are required for GPI anchor biosynthesis and PIGA is involved in the first step of this process. A hypomorphic mutation in the X-linked PIGA gene (c.1234C>T) causes multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizure syndrome 2 (MCAHS2), indicating that even partial reduction of GPI anchored proteins dramatically impairs central nervous system development, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we established a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) model containing the PIGAc.1234C>T mutation to study the effects of a hypomorphic allele of PIGA on neuronal development. Neuronal differentiation from neural progenitor cells generated by EB formation in PIGAc.1234C>T is significantly impaired with decreased proliferation, aberrant synapse formation and abnormal membrane depolarization. The results provide direct evidence for a critical role of GPI anchor proteins in early neurodevelopment. Furthermore, neural progenitors derived from PIGAc.1234C>T hiPSCs demonstrate increased susceptibility to complement-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting that defective complement regulation may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

AB - Mutations in genes involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis underlie a group of congenital syndromes characterized by severe neurodevelopmental defects. GPI anchored proteins have diverse roles in cell adhesion, signaling, metabolism and complement regulation. Over 30 enzymes are required for GPI anchor biosynthesis and PIGA is involved in the first step of this process. A hypomorphic mutation in the X-linked PIGA gene (c.1234C>T) causes multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizure syndrome 2 (MCAHS2), indicating that even partial reduction of GPI anchored proteins dramatically impairs central nervous system development, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we established a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) model containing the PIGAc.1234C>T mutation to study the effects of a hypomorphic allele of PIGA on neuronal development. Neuronal differentiation from neural progenitor cells generated by EB formation in PIGAc.1234C>T is significantly impaired with decreased proliferation, aberrant synapse formation and abnormal membrane depolarization. The results provide direct evidence for a critical role of GPI anchor proteins in early neurodevelopment. Furthermore, neural progenitors derived from PIGAc.1234C>T hiPSCs demonstrate increased susceptibility to complement-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting that defective complement regulation may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018844619&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018844619&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0174074

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0174074

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - PLoS One

T2 - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

M1 - e0174074

ER -