A higher adherence to a mediterranean-style diet is inversely associated with the development of frailty in community-dwelling elderly men and women

Sameera A. Talegawkar, Stefania Bandinelli, Karen J Bandeen Roche, Ping Chen, Yuri Milaneschi, Toshiko Tanaka, Richard David Semba, Jack M. Guralnik, Luigi Ferrucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet is associated with a lower risk for mortality, cognitive decline, and dementia. Whether adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet protects against age-related frailty is unclear. Therefore, our objective was to examine the association between a Mediterranean-style diet with the risk of frailty in community-dwelling older persons. We conducted longitudinal analyses using data from 690 community-living persons (≥65 y) who were randomly selected from a population registry in Tuscany, Italy. Participants of the Invecchiare in Chianti study of aging completed the baseline examination in 1998-2000 and were re-examined at least once over 6 y. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (scored 0-9, modeled categorically as ≤3, 4-5, and ≥6) was computed from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition FFQ previously validated in this cohort. Frailty was defined as having at least 2 of the following criteria: poor muscle strength, feeling of exhaustion, low walking speed, and low physical activity. After a 6-y follow-up, higher adherence (score $6) to a Mediterranean-style diet was associated with lower odds of developing frailty [OR = 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.66)] compared with those with lower adherence (score ≤3). A higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet at baseline was also associated with a lower risk of low physical activity (OR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.96) and low walking speed [OR = 0.48 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.86)] but not with feelings of exhaustion and poor muscle strength. In community-dwelling older adults, higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet was inversely associated with the development of frailty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2161-2166
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume142
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Mediterranean Diet
Independent Living
Muscle Strength
Emotions
Exercise
Italy
Dementia
Registries
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A higher adherence to a mediterranean-style diet is inversely associated with the development of frailty in community-dwelling elderly men and women. / Talegawkar, Sameera A.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bandeen Roche, Karen J; Chen, Ping; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Semba, Richard David; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 142, No. 12, 12.2012, p. 2161-2166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talegawkar, Sameera A. ; Bandinelli, Stefania ; Bandeen Roche, Karen J ; Chen, Ping ; Milaneschi, Yuri ; Tanaka, Toshiko ; Semba, Richard David ; Guralnik, Jack M. ; Ferrucci, Luigi. / A higher adherence to a mediterranean-style diet is inversely associated with the development of frailty in community-dwelling elderly men and women. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 142, No. 12. pp. 2161-2166.
@article{3732fa8fa0164d30970131bbb550bda5,
title = "A higher adherence to a mediterranean-style diet is inversely associated with the development of frailty in community-dwelling elderly men and women",
abstract = "Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet is associated with a lower risk for mortality, cognitive decline, and dementia. Whether adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet protects against age-related frailty is unclear. Therefore, our objective was to examine the association between a Mediterranean-style diet with the risk of frailty in community-dwelling older persons. We conducted longitudinal analyses using data from 690 community-living persons (≥65 y) who were randomly selected from a population registry in Tuscany, Italy. Participants of the Invecchiare in Chianti study of aging completed the baseline examination in 1998-2000 and were re-examined at least once over 6 y. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (scored 0-9, modeled categorically as ≤3, 4-5, and ≥6) was computed from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition FFQ previously validated in this cohort. Frailty was defined as having at least 2 of the following criteria: poor muscle strength, feeling of exhaustion, low walking speed, and low physical activity. After a 6-y follow-up, higher adherence (score $6) to a Mediterranean-style diet was associated with lower odds of developing frailty [OR = 0.30 (95{\%} CI: 0.14, 0.66)] compared with those with lower adherence (score ≤3). A higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet at baseline was also associated with a lower risk of low physical activity (OR = 0.62; 95{\%} CI: 0.40, 0.96) and low walking speed [OR = 0.48 (95{\%} CI: 0.27, 0.86)] but not with feelings of exhaustion and poor muscle strength. In community-dwelling older adults, higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet was inversely associated with the development of frailty.",
author = "Talegawkar, {Sameera A.} and Stefania Bandinelli and {Bandeen Roche}, {Karen J} and Ping Chen and Yuri Milaneschi and Toshiko Tanaka and Semba, {Richard David} and Guralnik, {Jack M.} and Luigi Ferrucci",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
doi = "10.3945/jn.112.165498",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "142",
pages = "2161--2166",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A higher adherence to a mediterranean-style diet is inversely associated with the development of frailty in community-dwelling elderly men and women

AU - Talegawkar, Sameera A.

AU - Bandinelli, Stefania

AU - Bandeen Roche, Karen J

AU - Chen, Ping

AU - Milaneschi, Yuri

AU - Tanaka, Toshiko

AU - Semba, Richard David

AU - Guralnik, Jack M.

AU - Ferrucci, Luigi

PY - 2012/12

Y1 - 2012/12

N2 - Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet is associated with a lower risk for mortality, cognitive decline, and dementia. Whether adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet protects against age-related frailty is unclear. Therefore, our objective was to examine the association between a Mediterranean-style diet with the risk of frailty in community-dwelling older persons. We conducted longitudinal analyses using data from 690 community-living persons (≥65 y) who were randomly selected from a population registry in Tuscany, Italy. Participants of the Invecchiare in Chianti study of aging completed the baseline examination in 1998-2000 and were re-examined at least once over 6 y. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (scored 0-9, modeled categorically as ≤3, 4-5, and ≥6) was computed from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition FFQ previously validated in this cohort. Frailty was defined as having at least 2 of the following criteria: poor muscle strength, feeling of exhaustion, low walking speed, and low physical activity. After a 6-y follow-up, higher adherence (score $6) to a Mediterranean-style diet was associated with lower odds of developing frailty [OR = 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.66)] compared with those with lower adherence (score ≤3). A higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet at baseline was also associated with a lower risk of low physical activity (OR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.96) and low walking speed [OR = 0.48 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.86)] but not with feelings of exhaustion and poor muscle strength. In community-dwelling older adults, higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet was inversely associated with the development of frailty.

AB - Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet is associated with a lower risk for mortality, cognitive decline, and dementia. Whether adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet protects against age-related frailty is unclear. Therefore, our objective was to examine the association between a Mediterranean-style diet with the risk of frailty in community-dwelling older persons. We conducted longitudinal analyses using data from 690 community-living persons (≥65 y) who were randomly selected from a population registry in Tuscany, Italy. Participants of the Invecchiare in Chianti study of aging completed the baseline examination in 1998-2000 and were re-examined at least once over 6 y. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (scored 0-9, modeled categorically as ≤3, 4-5, and ≥6) was computed from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition FFQ previously validated in this cohort. Frailty was defined as having at least 2 of the following criteria: poor muscle strength, feeling of exhaustion, low walking speed, and low physical activity. After a 6-y follow-up, higher adherence (score $6) to a Mediterranean-style diet was associated with lower odds of developing frailty [OR = 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.66)] compared with those with lower adherence (score ≤3). A higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet at baseline was also associated with a lower risk of low physical activity (OR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.96) and low walking speed [OR = 0.48 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.86)] but not with feelings of exhaustion and poor muscle strength. In community-dwelling older adults, higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet was inversely associated with the development of frailty.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84872249834&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84872249834&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3945/jn.112.165498

DO - 10.3945/jn.112.165498

M3 - Article

C2 - 23096005

AN - SCOPUS:84872249834

VL - 142

SP - 2161

EP - 2166

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 12

ER -