A high-fat diet does not influence the growth of the Dunning R3327-H transplantable prostate adenocarcinoma

Eric D. Schwab, Dan Normolle, Ronald A. Pacis, Sung Soo Cho, Kenneth J. Pienta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The etiology of prostate cancer is currently a mystery. Several epidemiological studies suggest a link between dietary fat and prostate cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies support this evidence. Using the Dunning model of rat prostate cancer we hypothesized that a high-fat diet (20%) would increase the growth of the R3327-H tumor. Materials and Methods: R3327-H tumors were implanted subcutaneously into male Copenhagen rats which were fed diets with 5 or 20% total fat. Tumors were allowed to grow for 16 weeks; they were then excised and weighed. The initial and final weights of the rats were also recorded. Results: Statistical analysis revealed the level of dietary fat was a positive predictor of weight gain (p < 0.01). No effect on tumor growth was seen when compared to dietary fat, fiber type, or the interaction of fat and fiber. Discussion: Growth of the R3327-H tumor, when implanted subcutaneously, is not affected by the level of dietary fat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3603-3607
Number of pages5
JournalAnticancer research
Volume18
Issue number5 A
StatePublished - Sep 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dietary fat
  • Dunning R3327-H tumor
  • Prostate cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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