A hemispherical map for the human brain cortex

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Understanding the function of the human brain cortex is a primary goal in human brain mapping. Visualization and mapping of function on the cortical surface, however, is difficult because of its sulcal and gyral convolutions. Methods to unfold and flatten the cortical surface for visualization and measurement have been described in the literature. This makes visualization and measurement possible, but comparison across multiple subjects is still difficult because of the lack of a standard mapping technique. We describe a new approach that maps each hemisphere of the cortex to a portion of a sphere in a standard way, making comparison of anatomy and function across different subjects possible. Starting with a three-dimensional magnetic resonance image of the brain, the cortex is segmented and represented as a triangle mesh. Defining a cut around the corpus collosum identifies the left and right hemispheres. Together, the two hemispheres are mapped to the complex plane using a conformal mapping technique. A Mobius transformation, which is conformal, is used to transform the points on the complex plane so that a projective transformation maps each brain hemisphere onto a spherical segment comprising a sphere with a cap removed. We determined the best size of the spherical cap by minimizing the relative area distortion between hemispherical maps and original cortical surfaces. The relative area distortion between the hemispherical maps and the original cortical surfaces for fifteen human brains is analyzed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsM. Sonka, K.M. Hanson
Pages290-300
Number of pages11
Volume4322
Edition1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
EventMedical Imaging 2001 Image Processing - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 19 2001Feb 22 2001

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2001 Image Processing
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/19/012/22/01

Fingerprint

cortexes
brain
Brain
hemispheres
Visualization
Brain mapping
Conformal mapping
spherical caps
Magnetic resonance
Convolution
conformal mapping
anatomy
convolution integrals
caps
triangles
magnetic resonance
mesh

Keywords

  • Brain cortex
  • Brain flattening
  • Brain mapping
  • Conformal mapping
  • MRI brain images

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Tosun, D., & Prince, J. L. (2001). A hemispherical map for the human brain cortex. In M. Sonka, & K. M. Hanson (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (1 ed., Vol. 4322, pp. 290-300) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.431099

A hemispherical map for the human brain cortex. / Tosun, D.; Prince, Jerry Ladd.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / M. Sonka; K.M. Hanson. Vol. 4322 1. ed. 2001. p. 290-300.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tosun, D & Prince, JL 2001, A hemispherical map for the human brain cortex. in M Sonka & KM Hanson (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 1 edn, vol. 4322, pp. 290-300, Medical Imaging 2001 Image Processing, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/19/01. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.431099
Tosun D, Prince JL. A hemispherical map for the human brain cortex. In Sonka M, Hanson KM, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 1 ed. Vol. 4322. 2001. p. 290-300 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.431099
Tosun, D. ; Prince, Jerry Ladd. / A hemispherical map for the human brain cortex. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / M. Sonka ; K.M. Hanson. Vol. 4322 1. ed. 2001. pp. 290-300
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