A gut-specific serine protease from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae is down regulated after blood ingestion

Z. Shen, M. J. Edwards, M. Jacobs-Lorena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A chymotrypsin-like serine protease gene (AgChyL) was cloned from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based subtractive cDNA cloning strategy. AgChyL messenger RNA (mRNA) is abundant in the adult female gut prior to, and for 8 h following, a blood meal. During the peak of digestion, from 12 to 24 h following a blood meal, AgChyL mRNA abundance decreased to barely detectable levels. AgChyL mRNA was abundant again by 48 h following a blood meal. Recombinant pro-AgChyL was expressed in Escherichia coli. The pro-enzyme can be activated by trypsin. Activated AgChyL cleaves the synthetic chymotrypsin substrate succinyl-L-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-nitroanilide, but not two other synthetic chymotrypsin substrates or synthetic trypsin and elastase substrates. The potential role of AgChyL in the coordination of An. gambiae digestion is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-229
Number of pages7
JournalInsect molecular biology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anopheles
  • Chymotrypsin
  • Digestion
  • Protease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Insect Science

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