A Glaucoma-Specific Brief Motivational Interviewing Training Program for Ophthalmology Para-professionals: Assessment of Feasibility and Initial Patient Impact

Paula Anne Newman-Casey, Olivia Killeen, Sarah Miller, Chamisa MacKenzie, Leslie M. Niziol, Ken Resnicow, John Creswell, Paul Cook, Michele Heisler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our objective was to test the feasibility of, fidelity to, and initial impact of a brief, glaucoma-specific motivational interviewing (MI) training program for ophthalmic para-professionals. This prospective, mixed-methods study had two components, one for staff and one for patients. Staff fidelity to MI principles was graded through audio-recorded encounters after initial and final training sessions. After training, patients graded staff for adherence to autonomy supportive care. Semi-structured interviews with para-professionals elicited feedback about the training and about their ability to implement MI in the clinic. The impact on patient satisfaction with staff communication, eye drop instillation self-efficacy, and overall health activation was assessed using a survey pre- and post-training. Para-professionals met two of three program goals for MI skills and improved in their overall scores for MI fidelity. Para-professionals noted lack of time in the clinic as a significant barrier to implementing counseling. Patient satisfaction with staff communication increased after the training (p = 0.04) among patients who rated their staff above the mean for providing autonomy supportive care. The intervention did not improve patients’ eye drop instillation self-efficacy or overall health activation. Training para-professional staff in brief, glaucoma-specific MI techniques is feasible and may improve patient satisfaction, though dedicated time in clinic is needed to implement MI counseling into glaucoma practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ophthalmology
Motivational Interviewing
Glaucoma
training program
Chemical activation
Health
staff
Education
Communication
Patient Satisfaction
Feedback
Ophthalmic Solutions
Self Efficacy
activation
self-efficacy
Counseling
counseling
autonomy
Aptitude
communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

A Glaucoma-Specific Brief Motivational Interviewing Training Program for Ophthalmology Para-professionals : Assessment of Feasibility and Initial Patient Impact. / Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Killeen, Olivia; Miller, Sarah; MacKenzie, Chamisa; Niziol, Leslie M.; Resnicow, Ken; Creswell, John; Cook, Paul; Heisler, Michele.

In: Health Communication, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newman-Casey, Paula Anne ; Killeen, Olivia ; Miller, Sarah ; MacKenzie, Chamisa ; Niziol, Leslie M. ; Resnicow, Ken ; Creswell, John ; Cook, Paul ; Heisler, Michele. / A Glaucoma-Specific Brief Motivational Interviewing Training Program for Ophthalmology Para-professionals : Assessment of Feasibility and Initial Patient Impact. In: Health Communication. 2018.
@article{411322f3d6954263af4d93e6e7d8877a,
title = "A Glaucoma-Specific Brief Motivational Interviewing Training Program for Ophthalmology Para-professionals: Assessment of Feasibility and Initial Patient Impact",
abstract = "Our objective was to test the feasibility of, fidelity to, and initial impact of a brief, glaucoma-specific motivational interviewing (MI) training program for ophthalmic para-professionals. This prospective, mixed-methods study had two components, one for staff and one for patients. Staff fidelity to MI principles was graded through audio-recorded encounters after initial and final training sessions. After training, patients graded staff for adherence to autonomy supportive care. Semi-structured interviews with para-professionals elicited feedback about the training and about their ability to implement MI in the clinic. The impact on patient satisfaction with staff communication, eye drop instillation self-efficacy, and overall health activation was assessed using a survey pre- and post-training. Para-professionals met two of three program goals for MI skills and improved in their overall scores for MI fidelity. Para-professionals noted lack of time in the clinic as a significant barrier to implementing counseling. Patient satisfaction with staff communication increased after the training (p = 0.04) among patients who rated their staff above the mean for providing autonomy supportive care. The intervention did not improve patients’ eye drop instillation self-efficacy or overall health activation. Training para-professional staff in brief, glaucoma-specific MI techniques is feasible and may improve patient satisfaction, though dedicated time in clinic is needed to implement MI counseling into glaucoma practice.",
author = "Newman-Casey, {Paula Anne} and Olivia Killeen and Sarah Miller and Chamisa MacKenzie and Niziol, {Leslie M.} and Ken Resnicow and John Creswell and Paul Cook and Michele Heisler",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/10410236.2018.1557357",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Health Communication",
issn = "1041-0236",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Glaucoma-Specific Brief Motivational Interviewing Training Program for Ophthalmology Para-professionals

T2 - Assessment of Feasibility and Initial Patient Impact

AU - Newman-Casey, Paula Anne

AU - Killeen, Olivia

AU - Miller, Sarah

AU - MacKenzie, Chamisa

AU - Niziol, Leslie M.

AU - Resnicow, Ken

AU - Creswell, John

AU - Cook, Paul

AU - Heisler, Michele

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Our objective was to test the feasibility of, fidelity to, and initial impact of a brief, glaucoma-specific motivational interviewing (MI) training program for ophthalmic para-professionals. This prospective, mixed-methods study had two components, one for staff and one for patients. Staff fidelity to MI principles was graded through audio-recorded encounters after initial and final training sessions. After training, patients graded staff for adherence to autonomy supportive care. Semi-structured interviews with para-professionals elicited feedback about the training and about their ability to implement MI in the clinic. The impact on patient satisfaction with staff communication, eye drop instillation self-efficacy, and overall health activation was assessed using a survey pre- and post-training. Para-professionals met two of three program goals for MI skills and improved in their overall scores for MI fidelity. Para-professionals noted lack of time in the clinic as a significant barrier to implementing counseling. Patient satisfaction with staff communication increased after the training (p = 0.04) among patients who rated their staff above the mean for providing autonomy supportive care. The intervention did not improve patients’ eye drop instillation self-efficacy or overall health activation. Training para-professional staff in brief, glaucoma-specific MI techniques is feasible and may improve patient satisfaction, though dedicated time in clinic is needed to implement MI counseling into glaucoma practice.

AB - Our objective was to test the feasibility of, fidelity to, and initial impact of a brief, glaucoma-specific motivational interviewing (MI) training program for ophthalmic para-professionals. This prospective, mixed-methods study had two components, one for staff and one for patients. Staff fidelity to MI principles was graded through audio-recorded encounters after initial and final training sessions. After training, patients graded staff for adherence to autonomy supportive care. Semi-structured interviews with para-professionals elicited feedback about the training and about their ability to implement MI in the clinic. The impact on patient satisfaction with staff communication, eye drop instillation self-efficacy, and overall health activation was assessed using a survey pre- and post-training. Para-professionals met two of three program goals for MI skills and improved in their overall scores for MI fidelity. Para-professionals noted lack of time in the clinic as a significant barrier to implementing counseling. Patient satisfaction with staff communication increased after the training (p = 0.04) among patients who rated their staff above the mean for providing autonomy supportive care. The intervention did not improve patients’ eye drop instillation self-efficacy or overall health activation. Training para-professional staff in brief, glaucoma-specific MI techniques is feasible and may improve patient satisfaction, though dedicated time in clinic is needed to implement MI counseling into glaucoma practice.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059009585&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85059009585&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/10410236.2018.1557357

DO - 10.1080/10410236.2018.1557357

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85059009585

JO - Health Communication

JF - Health Communication

SN - 1041-0236

ER -