A genome-wide association study implicates diacylglycerol kinase eta (DGKH) and several other genes in the etiology of bipolar disorder

A. E. Baum, N. Akula, M. Cabanero, I. Cardona, W. Corona, B. Klemens, T. G. Schulze, S. Cichon, M. Rietschel, M. M. Nöthen, A. Georgi, J. Schumacher, M. Schwarz, R. Abou Jamra, S. Höfels, P. Propping, J. Satagopan, S. D. Detera-Wadleigh, J. Hardy, F. J. McMahon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The genetic basis of bipolar disorder has long been thought to be complex, with the potential involvement of multiple genes, but methods to analyze populations with respect to this complexity have only recently become available. We have carried out a genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder by genotyping over 550 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two independent case-control samples of European origin. The initial association screen was performed using pooled DNA, and selected SNPs were confirmed by individual genotyping. While DNA pooling reduces power to detect genetic associations, there is a substantial cost saving and gain in efficiency. A total of 88 SNPs, representing 80 different genes, met the prior criteria for replication in both samples. Effect sizes were modest: no single SNP of large effect was detected. Of 37 SNPs selected for individual genotyping, the strongest association signal was detected at a marker within the first intron of diacylglycerol kinase eta (DGKH; P=1.5 × 10-8, experiment-wide P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-207
Number of pages11
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Diacylglycerol Kinase
Genome-Wide Association Study
Bipolar Disorder
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Genes
DNA
Introns
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

Keywords

  • DAG
  • DFNB31
  • Mania
  • SORCS2
  • Whirlin
  • Wnt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A genome-wide association study implicates diacylglycerol kinase eta (DGKH) and several other genes in the etiology of bipolar disorder. / Baum, A. E.; Akula, N.; Cabanero, M.; Cardona, I.; Corona, W.; Klemens, B.; Schulze, T. G.; Cichon, S.; Rietschel, M.; Nöthen, M. M.; Georgi, A.; Schumacher, J.; Schwarz, M.; Abou Jamra, R.; Höfels, S.; Propping, P.; Satagopan, J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S. D.; Hardy, J.; McMahon, F. J.

In: Molecular Psychiatry, Vol. 13, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 197-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baum, AE, Akula, N, Cabanero, M, Cardona, I, Corona, W, Klemens, B, Schulze, TG, Cichon, S, Rietschel, M, Nöthen, MM, Georgi, A, Schumacher, J, Schwarz, M, Abou Jamra, R, Höfels, S, Propping, P, Satagopan, J, Detera-Wadleigh, SD, Hardy, J & McMahon, FJ 2008, 'A genome-wide association study implicates diacylglycerol kinase eta (DGKH) and several other genes in the etiology of bipolar disorder', Molecular Psychiatry, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 197-207. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.mp.4002012
Baum, A. E. ; Akula, N. ; Cabanero, M. ; Cardona, I. ; Corona, W. ; Klemens, B. ; Schulze, T. G. ; Cichon, S. ; Rietschel, M. ; Nöthen, M. M. ; Georgi, A. ; Schumacher, J. ; Schwarz, M. ; Abou Jamra, R. ; Höfels, S. ; Propping, P. ; Satagopan, J. ; Detera-Wadleigh, S. D. ; Hardy, J. ; McMahon, F. J. / A genome-wide association study implicates diacylglycerol kinase eta (DGKH) and several other genes in the etiology of bipolar disorder. In: Molecular Psychiatry. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 197-207.
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