A general method for the chromosomal amplification of genes in yeast

Jef D. Boeke, Hua Xu, Gerald R. Fink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The yeast retrotransposon Ty can be used to insert multiple copies of a gene at new sites in the genome. The gene of interest is inserted into a GAL1-Ty fusion construct; the entire "amplification cassette" is then introduced into yeast on a high copy number plasmid vector. Transposition of the Ty element carrying the gene occurs at multiple sites in the genome. Two genes, a bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase gene and the yeast TRP1 gene, were amplified in this way. Although the amplified genes were about 1 kilobase in length, they were amplified to about the same extent as a 40-base pair segment. The benefit of this "shotgun" approach is that amplification can be achieved in one set of manipulations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-282
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume239
Issue number4837
StatePublished - 1988

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Gene Amplification
Yeasts
Genes
Kanamycin Kinase
Genome
Bacterial Genes
Retroelements
Firearms
Base Pairing
Plasmids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Boeke, J. D., Xu, H., & Fink, G. R. (1988). A general method for the chromosomal amplification of genes in yeast. Science, 239(4837), 280-282.

A general method for the chromosomal amplification of genes in yeast. / Boeke, Jef D.; Xu, Hua; Fink, Gerald R.

In: Science, Vol. 239, No. 4837, 1988, p. 280-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boeke, JD, Xu, H & Fink, GR 1988, 'A general method for the chromosomal amplification of genes in yeast', Science, vol. 239, no. 4837, pp. 280-282.
Boeke JD, Xu H, Fink GR. A general method for the chromosomal amplification of genes in yeast. Science. 1988;239(4837):280-282.
Boeke, Jef D. ; Xu, Hua ; Fink, Gerald R. / A general method for the chromosomal amplification of genes in yeast. In: Science. 1988 ; Vol. 239, No. 4837. pp. 280-282.
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