A follow-up study with oocyte donors exploring their experiences, knowledge, and attitudes about the use of their oocytes and the outcome of the donation

Andrea L. Kalfoglou, Gail Geller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To learn what information oocyte donors were given and wanted to have about the use of their oocytes and the outcome of the donation. Design: In-depth interviews. Setting: Participants recruited through IVF clinics, matching agency, the Internet, word of mouth, and newspaper ads. Participant(s): Thirty-three former oocyte donors and six women preparing to donate. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): None. Result(s): Thirty-three former donors completed 66 donation cycles; 48 donation cycles were anonymous. Only 41% (16 of 39) of all participants were comfortable giving the recipient couple complete dispositional authority over the resulting embryos; the remainder wanted some control. One quarter did not want embryos used for research. Fifty-four percent (21 of 39) thought donation of excess embryos to another couple was acceptable, but one third wanted to be informed. Of the 25 anonymous donors, 6 learned the outcome of the donation; 14 others wanted to know. All hoped the donation was successful. Conclusion(s): Because oocyte donors' need for information varies, clinics should consider being more flexible in their disclosure policies. Disclosure about the possible uses of donor oocytes or embryos should be mandatory. Findings have implications for the informed consent and counseling processes. (C) 2000 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)660-667
Number of pages8
JournalFertility and sterility
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2000

Keywords

  • Embryo research
  • Informed consent
  • Oocyte donation
  • Qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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