A follow-up study of the commission on chronic illness morbidity survey in baltimore -IV. Factors influencing mortality from stroke and arteriosclerotic heart disease (1954-1967)

Lewis Kuller, Susan Tonascia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Commission on Chronic Illness Survey population has been followed from 1954 to 1967. Previous reports have described subsequent mortality in relation to demographic characteristics and population mobility to 1962. A recent study compared the survivorship of screenees and non-screenees. The present study extends the mortality follow-up to 1966-1967. Only 3.9 per cent of the population was lost to follow-up. Men had substantially higher all cause and arteriosclerotic heart disease mortality than women and blacks had higher all cause and stroke mortality than whites. A history of hypertension, heart disease, or diabetes was associated with a substantially increased risk of all cause, stroke and arteriosclerotic heart disease deaths. Individuals with abnormal screening tests also had a markedly increased mortality. A study of the married couples in the sample failed to reveal any evidence of spouse aggregation of either all cause or specific cause mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-124
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Chronic Diseases
Volume24
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1971

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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