A Decade of Difficult Airway Response Team. Lessons Learned from a Hospital-Wide Difficult Airway Response Team Program

Lynette J Mark, Laeben Lester, Renee Cover, Kurt Herzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A decade ago the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART) program was created at The Johns Hopkins Hospital as a multidisciplinary effort to address airway-related adverse events in the nonoperative setting. Root cause analysis of prior events indicated that a major factor in adverse patient outcomes was lack of a systematic approach for responding to difficult airway patients in an emergency. The DART program encompasses operational, safety, and educational initiatives and has responded to approximately 1000 events since its initiation, with no resultant adult airway-related adverse events or morbidity. This article provides lessons learned and recommendations for initiating a DART program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCritical Care Clinics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Root Cause Analysis
Emergencies
Morbidity
Safety

Keywords

  • Difficult airway patient
  • Difficult airway registry
  • Difficult airway response team
  • Hospital difficult airway alert systems
  • Multidisciplinary airway management
  • Rapid response teams
  • Second victim
  • Simulation-based medical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "A decade ago the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART) program was created at The Johns Hopkins Hospital as a multidisciplinary effort to address airway-related adverse events in the nonoperative setting. Root cause analysis of prior events indicated that a major factor in adverse patient outcomes was lack of a systematic approach for responding to difficult airway patients in an emergency. The DART program encompasses operational, safety, and educational initiatives and has responded to approximately 1000 events since its initiation, with no resultant adult airway-related adverse events or morbidity. This article provides lessons learned and recommendations for initiating a DART program.",
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