A culturally specific dietary plan to manage weight gain among African American breast cancer survivors: A feasibility study

Kathleen A. Griffith, Renee Royak-Schaler, Kim Nesbitt, Min Zhan, Adriane Kozlovsky, Kristen Marie Hurley, Colleen Pelser, Katherine H Rak Tkaczuk, Alice S. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Breast cancer survival rates are lower in African Americans (AAs) than in Caucasians, owing in part to a higher prevalence of obesity in the former, which increases the risk of recurrence and mortality. The Women's Intervention Nutrition Study (WINS) found that Caucasian women who followed a low-fat eating plan experienced a lower rate of cancer recurrence than women who maintained their usual diets. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a WINS plan tailored to the cultural needs of AA breast cancer survivors. This feasibility pilot study was conducted at a university National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center outpatient clinic with AA breast cancer survivors. The culturally specific WINS (WINS-c) plan included eight individual counseling sessions, five educational group meetings, and follow-up telephone calls over a 1-year period. Outcome measures included dietary fat, triglyceride, insulin and glucose levels, and fruit and vegetable intake. Participants (n = 8) had a mean age of 61.1 years (standard error of the mean (SEM) 3.1 years) and a mean BMI of 32 kg/m2 (SEM 4.25 kg/m)2. Baseline daily fat consumption decreased from 64.6 g (range 36.8- 119.6g) to 44.0 g (21.6-73.4g) at 52 weeks (p = 0.07). Mean daily consumption of fruits and vegetables increased by 36% and 15%, respectively. Mean triglyceride levels decreased at 12 months (p <0.05). Sustained hyperinsulinemia was noted in most participants, including those without diabetes. Mean calcium and vitamin D consumption decreased over the 1-year study period. In AA breast cancer survivors, the WINS-c program resulted in a trend toward reduced fat consumption and may represent a sustainable approach in this population for improvement of diet quality after breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-105
Number of pages9
JournalNutrition and Health
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
African Americans
Weight Gain
Survivors
Breast Neoplasms
Fats
Vegetables
Fruit
Triglycerides
Diet
Recurrence
Group Processes
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Dietary Fats
Hyperinsulinism
Quality Improvement
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Telephone
Vitamin D
Counseling

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer survivorship
  • Health disparities
  • Weight gain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A culturally specific dietary plan to manage weight gain among African American breast cancer survivors : A feasibility study. / Griffith, Kathleen A.; Royak-Schaler, Renee; Nesbitt, Kim; Zhan, Min; Kozlovsky, Adriane; Hurley, Kristen Marie; Pelser, Colleen; Tkaczuk, Katherine H Rak; Ryan, Alice S.

In: Nutrition and Health, Vol. 21, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 97-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Griffith, KA, Royak-Schaler, R, Nesbitt, K, Zhan, M, Kozlovsky, A, Hurley, KM, Pelser, C, Tkaczuk, KHR & Ryan, AS 2012, 'A culturally specific dietary plan to manage weight gain among African American breast cancer survivors: A feasibility study', Nutrition and Health, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 97-105. https://doi.org/10.1177/0260106012459938
Griffith, Kathleen A. ; Royak-Schaler, Renee ; Nesbitt, Kim ; Zhan, Min ; Kozlovsky, Adriane ; Hurley, Kristen Marie ; Pelser, Colleen ; Tkaczuk, Katherine H Rak ; Ryan, Alice S. / A culturally specific dietary plan to manage weight gain among African American breast cancer survivors : A feasibility study. In: Nutrition and Health. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 97-105.
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