A cross-sectional study of the feasibility of pharmacy-delivered harm reduction services among people who inject drugs in Xichang, China

Yi Yang, Carl A Latkin, Rongsheng Luan, Cui Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: HIV prevalence is high in Liangshan, China (1.1 %). In 2012, people who inject drugs (PWID) in Xichang, the capital city, contributed to 60.0 % of the HIV infections. The goal of the current study was to examine the feasibility of implementing pharmacy-delivered harm reduction services (PDHRS) for PWID. Methods: Face-to-face structured interviews with 403 PWID included questions on PWID's experiences of syringe services and their specific experiences, acceptance, and potential usage of PDHRS. Results: There were some reports of harassment/bad treatment from pharmacists (12.2 %) and police (17.6 %). Non-prescription syringe sales (NPSS) from pharmacies in single piece were the main source (82.1 %) of syringes. 72.5 % of PWID reported visiting 31.5 % of the identified pharmacies. Most (74.7 %) PWID disposed of their used syringes by throwing them away. Only one PWID brought used syringes back to a pharmacy in the past 30 days. Half of the PDHRS, such as printed materials about HIV, Hepatitis C and STIs; risk reduction services; (16.9 %) and sharps container to dispose of syringes (0.2 %) were offered by a few pharmacies (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number885
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 14 2015

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Harm Reduction
Syringes
China
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pharmacies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
HIV
Police
Risk Reduction Behavior
Hepatitis C
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Pharmacists
HIV Infections
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "A cross-sectional study of the feasibility of pharmacy-delivered harm reduction services among people who inject drugs in Xichang, China",
abstract = "Background: HIV prevalence is high in Liangshan, China (1.1 {\%}). In 2012, people who inject drugs (PWID) in Xichang, the capital city, contributed to 60.0 {\%} of the HIV infections. The goal of the current study was to examine the feasibility of implementing pharmacy-delivered harm reduction services (PDHRS) for PWID. Methods: Face-to-face structured interviews with 403 PWID included questions on PWID's experiences of syringe services and their specific experiences, acceptance, and potential usage of PDHRS. Results: There were some reports of harassment/bad treatment from pharmacists (12.2 {\%}) and police (17.6 {\%}). Non-prescription syringe sales (NPSS) from pharmacies in single piece were the main source (82.1 {\%}) of syringes. 72.5 {\%} of PWID reported visiting 31.5 {\%} of the identified pharmacies. Most (74.7 {\%}) PWID disposed of their used syringes by throwing them away. Only one PWID brought used syringes back to a pharmacy in the past 30 days. Half of the PDHRS, such as printed materials about HIV, Hepatitis C and STIs; risk reduction services; (16.9 {\%}) and sharps container to dispose of syringes (0.2 {\%}) were offered by a few pharmacies (",
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