A cross-sectional study of the association between chronic hepatitis c virus infection and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis among participants in the multicenter AIDS cohort study

Rebeccah A. Mckibben, Sabina A. Haberlen, Wendy S. Post, Todd T. Brown, Matthew Budoff, Mallory D. Witt, Lawrence A. Kingsley, Frank J. Palella, Chloe L. Thio, Eric C. Seaberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated the association of chronic HCV infection and coronary atherosclerosis among participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Methods. We assessed 994 men with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (87 of whom had chronic HCV infection) for coronary plaque, using noncontrast coronary computed tomography (CT); 755 also underwent CT angiography. We then evaluated the associations of chronic HCV infection and HIV infection with measures of plaque prevalence, extent, and stenosis. Results. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, HIV serostatus, behaviors, and CVD risk factors, chronic HCV infection was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of coronary artery calcium (prevalence ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.63), any plaque (prevalence ratio, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.09-1.45), and noncalcified plaque (prevalence ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.16-1.75). Chronic HCV infection and HIV infection were independently associated with the prevalence of any plaque and of noncalcified plaque, but there was no evidence of a synergistic effect due to HIV/HCV coinfection. The prevalences of coronary artery calcium, any plaque, noncalcified plaque, a mixture of noncalcified and calcified plaque, and calcified plaque were significantly higher among men with an HCV RNA load of ≥2 × 106 IU/mL, compared with findings among men without chronic HCV infection. Conclusions. Chronic HCV infection is associated with subclinical CVD, suggesting that vigilant assessments of cardiovascular risk are warranted for HCV-infected individuals. Future research should determine whether HCV infection duration or HCV treatment influence coronary plaque development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-265
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume213
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2016

Keywords

  • atherosclerosis
  • cardiovascular disease
  • hepatitis C virus infection
  • human immunodeficiency virus type 1
  • plaque

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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