A cross-sectional study of indications for cesarean deliveries in Médecins Sans Frontières facilities across 17 countries

Reinou S. Groen, Miguel Trelles, Severine Caluwaerts, Jessica Papillon-Smith, Saiqa Noor, Burhani Qudsia, Brigitte Ndelema, Kalla M. Kondo, Evan G. Wong, Hiten D. Patel, Adam L. Kushner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To review the major indications for cesareans performed by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) personnel from the Operational Center Brussels. Methods A retrospective study was undertaken of all singleton cesarean deliveries from 2008-2012 for which indications were recorded. Location of project, age of patient, type of anesthesia, and duration of operation were also recorded. Results A total of 14 151 singleton cesarean deliveries were identified from 17 countries. Among the 15 905 indications recorded, the most common was failure to progress or cephalopelvic disproportion (4822 [30.3%]), followed by previous uterine scar (2504 [15.7%]), non-reassuring fetal status (2306 [14.5%]), and fetal malpresentation (1746 [11.0%]). Other indications were placenta or vasa previa (794 [5.0%]), uterine rupture (676 [4.3%]), hypertensive disorders (659 [4.1%]), placental abruption (520 [3.3%]), pre-rupture (450 [2.8%]), and cord prolapse (365 [2.3%]). Conclusion Indications for cesareans in MSF settings differ from those in higher-income countries. Further investigation is needed for adequate emergency obstetric care coverage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-235
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume129
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cesarean delivery
  • Doctors Without Borders
  • Global surgery
  • Indications
  • Maternal health
  • Médecins Sans Frontières
  • Obstetrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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