A Cross-Sectional Population Study of Geographic, Age-Specific, and Household Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Infection in Western Kenya

Sally Peprah, Constance Tenge, Isaiah O. Genga, Mediatrix Mumia, Pamela A. Were, Robert T. Kuremu, Walter N. Wekesa, Peter O. Sumba, Tobias Kinyera, Isaac Otim, Ismail D. Legason, Joshua Biddle, Steven James Reynolds, Ambrose O. Talisuna, Robert J. Biggar, Kishor Bhatia, James J. Goedert, Ruth M. Pfeiffer, Sam M. Mbulaiteye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The burden of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria in Kenya is decreasing; however, it is still one of the top 10 causes of morbidity, particularly in regions of western Kenya. Between April 2015 and June 2016, we enrolled 965 apparently healthy children aged 0-15 years in former Nyanza and Western Provinces in Kenya to characterize the demographic, geographic, and household risk factors of asymptomatic malaria as part of an epidemiologic study to investigate the risk factors for endemic Burkitt lymphoma. The children were sampled using a stratified, multistage cluster sampling survey design. Malaria was assessed by rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and thick-film microscopy (TFM). Primary analyses of Pf malaria prevalence (pfPR) are based on RDT. Associations between weighted pfPR and potential risk factors were evaluated using logistic regression, accounting for the survey design. Plasmodium falciparum malaria prevalence was 36.0% (27.5%, 44.5%) by RDT and 22.3% (16.0%, 28.6%) by TFM. Plasmodium falciparum malaria prevalence was positively associated with living in the lake-endemic area (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.46; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.63, 7.37), paternal occupation as peasant farmer (aOR 1.87; 1.08, 3.26) or manual laborer (aOR 1.83; 1.00, 3.37), and keeping dogs (aOR 1.62; 0.98-2.69) or cows (aOR 1.52; 0.96-2.40) inside or near the household. Plasmodium falciparum malaria prevalence was inversely associated with indoor residual insecticide spraying (IRS) (aOR 0.44; 0.19, 1.01), having a household connected to electricity (aOR 0.47; 0.22, 0.98), and a household with two (aOR 0.45; 0.22, 0.93) or ≥ three rooms (aOR 0.41; 0.18, 0.93). We report high but geographically heterogeneous pfPR in children in western Kenya and significant associations with IRS and household-level socioeconomic factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-65
Number of pages12
JournalThe American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
Volume100
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Falciparum Malaria
Kenya
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Infection
Population
Malaria
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Insecticides
Microscopy
Electricity
Burkitt Lymphoma
Lakes
Occupations
Epidemiologic Studies
Logistic Models
Demography
Dogs
Confidence Intervals
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

A Cross-Sectional Population Study of Geographic, Age-Specific, and Household Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Infection in Western Kenya. / Peprah, Sally; Tenge, Constance; Genga, Isaiah O.; Mumia, Mediatrix; Were, Pamela A.; Kuremu, Robert T.; Wekesa, Walter N.; Sumba, Peter O.; Kinyera, Tobias; Otim, Isaac; Legason, Ismail D.; Biddle, Joshua; Reynolds, Steven James; Talisuna, Ambrose O.; Biggar, Robert J.; Bhatia, Kishor; Goedert, James J.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

In: The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, Vol. 100, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 54-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peprah, S, Tenge, C, Genga, IO, Mumia, M, Were, PA, Kuremu, RT, Wekesa, WN, Sumba, PO, Kinyera, T, Otim, I, Legason, ID, Biddle, J, Reynolds, SJ, Talisuna, AO, Biggar, RJ, Bhatia, K, Goedert, JJ, Pfeiffer, RM & Mbulaiteye, SM 2019, 'A Cross-Sectional Population Study of Geographic, Age-Specific, and Household Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Infection in Western Kenya', The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, vol. 100, no. 1, pp. 54-65. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0481
Peprah, Sally ; Tenge, Constance ; Genga, Isaiah O. ; Mumia, Mediatrix ; Were, Pamela A. ; Kuremu, Robert T. ; Wekesa, Walter N. ; Sumba, Peter O. ; Kinyera, Tobias ; Otim, Isaac ; Legason, Ismail D. ; Biddle, Joshua ; Reynolds, Steven James ; Talisuna, Ambrose O. ; Biggar, Robert J. ; Bhatia, Kishor ; Goedert, James J. ; Pfeiffer, Ruth M. ; Mbulaiteye, Sam M. / A Cross-Sectional Population Study of Geographic, Age-Specific, and Household Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Infection in Western Kenya. In: The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene. 2019 ; Vol. 100, No. 1. pp. 54-65.
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AU - Mumia, Mediatrix

AU - Were, Pamela A.

AU - Kuremu, Robert T.

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AU - Reynolds, Steven James

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AU - Biggar, Robert J.

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