A controlled study of the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in randomly selected patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

Katherine S. Ginsburg, Elizabeth A. Wright, Martin G. Larson, Anne H. Fossel, Marilyn Albert, Peter H. Schur, Matthew H. Liang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To investigate the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in randomly selected patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. Randomly selected, ambulatory patients with SLE (n = 49) or with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 40) completed neuropsychological tests. These included Associate Learning, Switching Attention, Continuous Performance, Associate Recall, Hand-Eye Coordination, Pattern Comparison, Pattern Memory, the Stroop Color and Word Test, and the Symptoms Checklist-90R. Results were evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis. Results. SLE patients had poorer performance than RA patients on the test of attention (P = 0.002) and tests of visuospatial ability (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04), independent of age, education, or steroid use. The conservative level of statistical significance, adjusting for multiple comparisons, was 0.005. SLE patients reported more symptoms of cognitive difficulty. Conclusion. Cognitive dysfunction is common in ambulatory SLE patients as measured by standardized tests and is a cause of distress and impaired functioning. Self-reported cognitive difficulty appears to correlate with objective performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)776-782
Number of pages7
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume35
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Cross-Sectional Studies
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Aptitude
Neuropsychological Tests
Checklist
Cognitive Dysfunction
Linear Models
Hand
Color
Steroids
Regression Analysis
Learning
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Ginsburg, K. S., Wright, E. A., Larson, M. G., Fossel, A. H., Albert, M., Schur, P. H., & Liang, M. H. (1992). A controlled study of the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in randomly selected patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 35(7), 776-782.

A controlled study of the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in randomly selected patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. / Ginsburg, Katherine S.; Wright, Elizabeth A.; Larson, Martin G.; Fossel, Anne H.; Albert, Marilyn; Schur, Peter H.; Liang, Matthew H.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 35, No. 7, 07.1992, p. 776-782.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ginsburg, KS, Wright, EA, Larson, MG, Fossel, AH, Albert, M, Schur, PH & Liang, MH 1992, 'A controlled study of the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in randomly selected patients with systemic lupus erythematosus', Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 35, no. 7, pp. 776-782.
Ginsburg, Katherine S. ; Wright, Elizabeth A. ; Larson, Martin G. ; Fossel, Anne H. ; Albert, Marilyn ; Schur, Peter H. ; Liang, Matthew H. / A controlled study of the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in randomly selected patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 1992 ; Vol. 35, No. 7. pp. 776-782.
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