A computer simulation of vaccine prioritization, allocation, and rationing during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic

Bruce Lee, Shawn T. Brown, George W. Korch, Philip C. Cooley, Richard K. Zimmerman, William D. Wheaton, Shanta M. Zimmer, John J. Grefenstette, Rachel R. Bailey, Tina Marie Assi, Donald S. Burke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the fall 2009, the University of Pittsburgh Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS) team employed an agent-based computer simulation model (ABM) of the greater Washington, DC, metropolitan region to assist the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Public Preparedness and Response, Department of Health and Human Services, to address several key questions regarding vaccine allocation during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, including comparing a vaccinating children (i.e., highest transmitters)-first policy versus the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)-recommended vaccinating at-risk individuals-first policy. Our study supported adherence to the ACIP (instead of a children-first policy) prioritization recommendations for the H1N1 influenza vaccine when vaccine is in limited supply and that within the ACIP groups, children should receive highest priority.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4875-4879
Number of pages5
JournalVaccine
Volume28
Issue number31
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

prioritization
Pandemics
pandemic
computer simulation
influenza
Computer Simulation
Human Influenza
Vaccines
Advisory Committees
vaccines
committees
Immunization
immunization
Department of Health and Human Services
United States Dept. of Health and Human Services
District of Columbia
risk groups
Influenza Vaccines
infectious diseases
Communicable Diseases

Keywords

  • Influenza
  • Pandemic
  • Vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lee, B., Brown, S. T., Korch, G. W., Cooley, P. C., Zimmerman, R. K., Wheaton, W. D., ... Burke, D. S. (2010). A computer simulation of vaccine prioritization, allocation, and rationing during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Vaccine, 28(31), 4875-4879. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.05.002

A computer simulation of vaccine prioritization, allocation, and rationing during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. / Lee, Bruce; Brown, Shawn T.; Korch, George W.; Cooley, Philip C.; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Wheaton, William D.; Zimmer, Shanta M.; Grefenstette, John J.; Bailey, Rachel R.; Assi, Tina Marie; Burke, Donald S.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 28, No. 31, 07.2010, p. 4875-4879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, B, Brown, ST, Korch, GW, Cooley, PC, Zimmerman, RK, Wheaton, WD, Zimmer, SM, Grefenstette, JJ, Bailey, RR, Assi, TM & Burke, DS 2010, 'A computer simulation of vaccine prioritization, allocation, and rationing during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic', Vaccine, vol. 28, no. 31, pp. 4875-4879. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.05.002
Lee, Bruce ; Brown, Shawn T. ; Korch, George W. ; Cooley, Philip C. ; Zimmerman, Richard K. ; Wheaton, William D. ; Zimmer, Shanta M. ; Grefenstette, John J. ; Bailey, Rachel R. ; Assi, Tina Marie ; Burke, Donald S. / A computer simulation of vaccine prioritization, allocation, and rationing during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. In: Vaccine. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 31. pp. 4875-4879.
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