A computational theory of adaptive behavior based on an evolutionary reinforcement mechanism

J. J. McDowell, Paul L. Soto, Jesse Dallery, Saule Kulubekova

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Two mathematical and two computational theories from the field of human and animal learning are combined to produce a more general theory of adaptive behavior. The cornerstone of this theory is an evolutionary algorithm for reinforcement learning that instantiates the idea that behavior evolves in response to selection pressure from the environment in the form of reinforcement. The evolutionary reinforcement algorithm, along with its associated equilibrium theory, are combined with a mathematical theory of conditioned reinforcement and a computational theory of associative learning that together solve the problem of credit assignment in a biologically plausible way. The result is a biologically-inspired computational theory that enables an artificial organism to adapt continuously to changing environmental conditions and to generate adaptive state-action sequences. Track: Artificial Life, Evolutionary Robotics, Adaptive Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGECCO 2006 - Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages175-182
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)1595931864, 9781595931863
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Event8th Annual Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference 2006 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Jul 8 2006Jul 12 2006

Publication series

NameGECCO 2006 - Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference
Volume1

Other

Other8th Annual Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period7/8/067/12/06

Keywords

  • Adaptive agents
  • Adaptive behavior
  • Conditioned reinforcement
  • Credit assignment
  • Delay-reduction theory
  • Evolutionary algorithms
  • Matching theory
  • Reinforcement learning
  • Rescorla-Wagner rule
  • Stimulus control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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