A computational model for sex-specific genetic architecture of complex traits in humans: Implications for mapping pain sensitivity

Chenguang Wang, Yun Cheng, Tian Liu, Qin Li, Roger B. Fillingim, Margaret R. Wallace, Roland Staud, Lee Kaplan, Rongling Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Understanding differences in the genetic architecture of complex traits between the two sexes has significant implications for evolutionary studies and clinical diagnosis. However, our knowledge about sex-specific genetic architecture is limited largely because of a lack of analytical models that can detect and quantify the effects of sex on the complexity of quantitative genetic variation. Here, we derived a statistical model for mapping DNA sequence variants that contribute to sex-specific differences in allele frequencies, linkage disequilibria, and additive and dominance genetic effects due to haplotype diversity. This model allows a genome-wide search for functional haplotypes and the estimation and test of haplotype by sex interactions and sex-specific heritability. The model, validated by simulation studies, was used to detect sex-specific functional haplotypes that encode a pain sensitivity trait in humans. The model could have important implications for mapping complex trait genes and studying the detailed genetic architecture of sex-specific differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13
JournalMolecular Pain
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 16 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pain
Haplotypes
Sex Characteristics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Statistical Models
Gene Frequency
Genome
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

A computational model for sex-specific genetic architecture of complex traits in humans : Implications for mapping pain sensitivity. / Wang, Chenguang; Cheng, Yun; Liu, Tian; Li, Qin; Fillingim, Roger B.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Staud, Roland; Kaplan, Lee; Wu, Rongling.

In: Molecular Pain, Vol. 4, 13, 16.04.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Chenguang ; Cheng, Yun ; Liu, Tian ; Li, Qin ; Fillingim, Roger B. ; Wallace, Margaret R. ; Staud, Roland ; Kaplan, Lee ; Wu, Rongling. / A computational model for sex-specific genetic architecture of complex traits in humans : Implications for mapping pain sensitivity. In: Molecular Pain. 2008 ; Vol. 4.
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