A computational and experimental study inside microfluidic systems: The role of shear stress and flow recirculation in cell docking

Margherita Cioffi, Matteo Moretti, Amir Manbachi, Bong Geun Chung, Ali Khademhosseini, Gabriele Dubini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, microfluidic devices containing microwells that enabled cell docking were investigated. We theoretically assessed the effect of geometry on recirculation areas and wall shear stress patterns within microwells and studied the relationship between the computational predictions and experimental cell docking. We used microchannels with 150 μm diameter microwells that had either 20 or 80 μm thickness. Flow within 80 μm deep microwells was subject to extensive recirculation areas and low shear stresses (<0.5 mPa) near the well base; whilst these were only presented within a 10 μm peripheral ring in 20 um thick microwells. We also experimentally demonstrated that cell docking was significantly higher (p<0.01) in 80 μm thick microwells as compared to 20 μm thick microwells. Finally, a computational tool which correlated physical and geometrical parameters of microwells with their fluid dynamic environment was developed and was also experimentally confirmed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-626
Number of pages8
JournalBiomedical microdevices
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cell docking
  • Computational fluid dynamic
  • Microfluidic device
  • Shear stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Biology

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