A comparison of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery post-myopic LASIK/PRK Intraocular Lens (IOL) calculator and the Ocular MD IOL calculator

David L. DeMill, Majid Moshirfar, Marcus C. Neuffer, Maylon Hsu, Shameema Sikder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: To compare the average values of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) and Ocular MD intraocular lens (IOL) calculators to assess their accuracy in predicting IOL power in patients with prior laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or photorefractive keratectomy. Methods: In this retrospective study, data from 21 eyes with previous LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy for myopia and subsequent cataract surgery was used in an IOL calculator comparison. The predicted IOL powers of the Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS averages were compared. The Ocular MD average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis) and the all calculator average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS) were also compared. Primary outcome measures were mean arithmetic and absolute IOL prediction error, variance in mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, and the percentage of eyes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D. Results: The Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages produced mean arithmetic IOL prediction errors of 0.57 and -0.61 diopters (D), respectively, which were significantly larger than errors from the ASCRS, Ocular MD, and all calculator averages (0.11, -0.02, and 0.02 D, respectively, all P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the methods in absolute IOL prediction error, variance, or the percentage of eyes with outcomes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D. Conclusion: The ASCRS average was more accurate in predicting IOL power than the Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages alone. Our methods using combinations of these averages which, when compared with the individual averages, showed a trend of decreased mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, mean absolute upper limit of IOL prediction error, and variance, while increasing the percentage of outcomes within ±0.50 D.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1409-1414
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - Nov 17 2011

Keywords

  • American society of cataract and refractive surgery
  • Intraocular lens calculator
  • Laser-in-situ keratomileusis
  • Ocular md
  • Photorefractive keratectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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