A comparison of abdominal surgical outcomes between African-American and Caucasian Crohn's patients

Nicole Griglione, Shadi Yarandi, Jahnavi Srinivasan, Thomas Ahearn, Tanvi Dhere

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and objective: Whether race affects the natural history of Crohn's disease is a matter of debate. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the differences in surgical outcomes between African-American (AA) and Caucasian (C) Crohn's patients undergoing surgery at a tertiary care referral center. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, the medical records of our institution were queried to identify consecutive AA and C patients who underwent surgery for Crohn's disease from December 1, 2009 to December 15, 2011. A retrospective chart review was performed using electronic medical records. Results: A total of 77 patients were included in this study, including 32 AA (41 %) and 45 C (59 %). No significant differences were seen with respect to age, gender, type of insurance, preoperative exposure to immunosuppressives, body mass index, or smoking history between the two populations (p>0.05). There was a trend toward lower albumin in AAs (p=0.09). AA and C patients who underwent their first Crohn's disease (CD)-related surgery had similar lag periods between diagnosis and surgery. No significant differences were seen in location of disease, indication for operation, and need for open laparotomy over laparoscopy. No significant differences were seen in need for a repeat operation within 90 days of the original surgery or major postoperative complications. There was a trend toward higher rate of minor complications in the AA group (p=0.07). Conclusion: No significant differences were noted in the current study in several preoperative variables and surgical outcomes between AA and C.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-922
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • Caucasians
  • Crohn's disease
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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