A comparative study of recording procedures for motor evoked potential signals

Gracee Agrawal, Shrivats Iyer, Angelo H. All

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Motor evoked potential (MEP) signals serve as an objective measure of the functional integrity of motor pathways in the spinal cord. Hence, they provide a reliable assessment of the extent of spinal cord injury (SCI). There are two methods currently being used for serial MEP recordings in rats: a low-frequency and a high-frequency method. In this paper, we compared the two methods and determined the better method for MEP recordings. We also compared the effect of two anesthetic agents - inhalational isoflurane and intraperitoneal ketamine - on the MEP signals. We found that under ketamine anesthesia, low-frequency stimulation led to more consistent results, while high-frequency stimulation required greater stimulation intensity and was prone to unwanted side-effects including excessive head twitches. We further found that isoflurane anesthesia severely depressed the MEP response for both low-frequency and high-frequency stimulation which rendered the resulting signal unusable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2086-2089
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424432967
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009

Other

Other31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period9/2/099/6/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

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