A comparative study of psychopathology and cognitive functions between cocaine- and opiate-dependent patients

I. D. Montoya, J. M. Hess, L. Covi, P. J. Fudala, R. E. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors examined cognitive and psychological differences between cocaine- and opiate-dependent individuals, using the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Shipley Institute of Living Scale (SILS). They studied a sample of 135 cocaine-dependent and 162 opiate-dependent patients entering drug abuse treatment studies at the National Institute on Drug Abuse-Addiction Research Center (NIDA-ARC) outpatient clinic. Cocaine-dependent patients had significantly higher estimated Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-R) IQ, vocabulary, abstraction, and total T scores, as measured by the SILS. On the SCL-90-R, cocaine-dependent patients had significantly higher scores for interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism; opiate-dependent patients had higher scores for somatization. The results suggest that cocaine-dependent patients have better cognitive function and more psychopathology than opiate-dependent patients entering drug abuse outpatient treatment studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994

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Opiate Alkaloids
Psychopathology
Cocaine
Cognition
Substance-Related Disorders
National Institute on Drug Abuse (U.S.)
Anxiety
Vocabulary
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Intelligence
Outpatients
Psychology
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Montoya, I. D., Hess, J. M., Covi, L., Fudala, P. J., & Johnson, R. E. (1994). A comparative study of psychopathology and cognitive functions between cocaine- and opiate-dependent patients. American Journal on Addictions, 3(1), 36-42.

A comparative study of psychopathology and cognitive functions between cocaine- and opiate-dependent patients. / Montoya, I. D.; Hess, J. M.; Covi, L.; Fudala, P. J.; Johnson, R. E.

In: American Journal on Addictions, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1994, p. 36-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Montoya, ID, Hess, JM, Covi, L, Fudala, PJ & Johnson, RE 1994, 'A comparative study of psychopathology and cognitive functions between cocaine- and opiate-dependent patients', American Journal on Addictions, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 36-42.
Montoya, I. D. ; Hess, J. M. ; Covi, L. ; Fudala, P. J. ; Johnson, R. E. / A comparative study of psychopathology and cognitive functions between cocaine- and opiate-dependent patients. In: American Journal on Addictions. 1994 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 36-42.
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