A Comparative Study of Psychopathology and Cognitive Functions Between Cocaine‐and Opiate‐Dependent Patients

Ivan D. Montoya, Judith M. Hess, Lino Covi, Paul J. Fudala, Rolley E. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors examined cognitive and psychological differences between cocaine‐ and opiate‐dependent individuals, using the Symptom Check List‐90‐Revised (SCL‐90‐R) and the Shipley Institute of Living Scale (SILS). They studied a sample of 135 cocaine‐dependent and 162 opiate‐dependent patients entering drug abuse treatment studies at the National Institute on Drug Abuse‐Addiction Research Center (NIDA‐ARC) outpatient clinic. Cocaine‐dependent patients had significantly higher estimated Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS‐R) IQ, vocabulary, abstraction, and total T scores, as measured by the SILS. On the SCL‐90‐R, cocaine‐dependent patients had significantly higher scores for interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism; opiate‐dependent patients had higher scores for somatization. The results suggest that cocaine‐dependent patients have better cognitive function and more psychopathology than opiate‐dependent patients entering drug abuse outpatient treatment studies. 1994 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalThe American Journal on Addictions
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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