A community health initiative: Evaluation and early lessons learned

M Christopher Gibbons, Samantha L. Illangasekare, Earnest Smith, Joan Kub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been shown to enhance trust and engagement among community academic partners. However, the value of CBPR among hyper-researched, inner-city communities has not been evaluated adequately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a CBPR based engagement process in an inner-city, hyper-researched, underserved community. Methods: A qualitative process evaluation was conducted using focus groups, key informant in-depth interviews, and a brief survey to evaluate the attitudes, perceptions, beliefs, impact of, and satisfaction with the CBPR engagement process used to plan and conduct a community asset mapping project. Results: Three focus groups, eight in-depth interviews, and survey responses from 31 individuals were obtained and analyzed. Findings include a sense of accomplishment and value with the engagement process, as well as a sense of tangible benefits of the process perceived by community members and academic research partners. Conclusions: CBPR may represent an effective approach to enhancing trust and community–academic collaboration even among cynical, resistant, hyper-researched, underserved communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-101
Number of pages13
JournalProgress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Community-Based Participatory Research
Health
health
evaluation
community
Focus Groups
Interviews
interview
Research
Values
assets
Group

Keywords

  • Community health partnerships
  • Community health research
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Health disparities
  • Needs assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

A community health initiative : Evaluation and early lessons learned. / Gibbons, M Christopher; Illangasekare, Samantha L.; Smith, Earnest; Kub, Joan.

In: Progress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 89-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gibbons, M Christopher ; Illangasekare, Samantha L. ; Smith, Earnest ; Kub, Joan. / A community health initiative : Evaluation and early lessons learned. In: Progress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 89-101.
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