A collaborative state of the science initiative: Transforming moral distress into moral resilience in nursing

Cynda Hylton Rushton, Kathy Schoonover-Shoffner, Maureen Shawn Kennedy

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

To examine practices for addressing moral distress, a collaborative project was developed by the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, the American Journal of Nursing, and the Journal of Christian Nursing, along with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses and the American Nurses Association. Its purpose was to identify strategies that individuals and systems can use to mitigate the detrimental effects of moral distress and foster moral resilience. On August 11 and 12, 2016, an invitational symposium, State of the Science: Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience in Nursing, was held at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland. Forty-five nurse clinicians, researchers, ethicists, organization representatives, and other stakeholders took part. The result of the symposium was group consensus on recommendations for addressing moral distress and building moral resilience in four areas: practice, education, research, and policy. Participants and the organizations represented were energized and committed to moving this agenda forward.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PagesS2-S6
JournalAmerican Journal of Nursing
Volume117
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2017

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Nursing
School Nursing
Organizations
American Nurses' Association
Ethicists
Nurse Clinicians
Baltimore
Bioethics
Critical Care
Nurses
Research Personnel
Education
Research

Keywords

  • Ethical practice
  • Moral distress
  • Moral resilience
  • Nursing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

A collaborative state of the science initiative : Transforming moral distress into moral resilience in nursing. / Rushton, Cynda Hylton; Schoonover-Shoffner, Kathy; Kennedy, Maureen Shawn.

In: American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 117, No. 2, 2017, p. S2-S6.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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