A cognitive behavioral therapy-informed self-management program for acute respiratory failure survivors: A feasibility study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The number of people surviving critical illness is rising rapidly around the globe. Survivorship comes at a cost, with approximately half of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) experiencing clinically significant symptoms of anxiety, and 32–40% of survivors having substantial anxiety symptoms in the months or years after hospitalization. Methods: This feasibility study reports on 11 consecutive ARF patients receiving up to six sessions of a psychological intervention for self-management of anxiety. Results: All 11 patients accepted and received the psychological intervention. Four patients did not fully complete all 6 sessions due to death (n = 1, 2 sessions completed), and early hospital discharge (n = 3, patients completed 2, 3 and 5 sessions). The median (IQR) score (range: 0–100; minimal clinically important difference: 13) for the Visual Analog Scale-Anxiety (VAS-A) pre-intervention was 70 (57, 75) points. During the intervention, all 11 patients had a decrease in VAS-A, with a median (IQR) decrease of 44 (19, 48) points. Conclusions: This self-management intervention appears acceptable and feasible to implement among ARF patients during and after an ICU stay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number872
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2 2021

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cognitive behavior therapies
  • Critical care
  • Critical care outcomes
  • Intensive care units

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A cognitive behavioral therapy-informed self-management program for acute respiratory failure survivors: A feasibility study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this